Three Transitions by Peter Campus

Introspective self-portraits that incorporate the artist’s dry humor

In Three Transitions, Peter Campus presents three introspective self-portraits that incorporate his dry humor. He begins with an image created by two cameras facing opposite sides of a paper wall and filming simultaneously. His back to one camera, Campus cuts through the paper. In the double image, it appears as if he is cutting through his back, which is both disconcerting and tongue-in-cheek. Campus then uses the “chroma–key effect” of superimposing one video image onto a similarly colored area of another image. He applies blue paint to his face, and during this process another image of himself is revealed; he then superimposes his image on a piece of blue paper, which he sets afire. AsThree Transitions moves between deadpan humor and seeming self-destruction, Campus explores the limits of visual perception as a measure of reality.

Peter Campus, (born 1937) is an American born artist, known for his interactive and single channel video work of the early 1970s, alongside an extensive body of photographic and digital video works to the present day. His work is widely collected by major museums and galleries, including the MoMA in New York, the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim MuseumTate Modern, the Renia Sofia and the Centre Pompidou. 

Source : MOMA | Wikipedia

Via : Prosthetic Knowledge

The Smokehouse

The process of constructing a pioneer-style log cabin

A collaboration between Smith Journal, Rohan Anderson of Whole Larder Love and Melbourne-based filmmakers Commoner, “The Smokehouse” marks the first of what is hopefully a series of short films that give insight into the life and motivation of interesting people featured in Smith Journal.

The process of constructing a pioneer-style cold smokehouse was a bit of an experiment for everyone involved. Most of the labour and shooting took place on Anderson’s place outside of Ballarat in Victoria, but the trees were felled from a nearby pine infestation taking over native bush land on a friend’s property. As Anderson explains in the video, the project was pretty ambitious. There was lots to be learnt during the process, but the final result speaks for itself

Source : Smith Journal

Via : Trend Tablet

prostheticknowledge:

Inside Insides

Magnetic resonance imaging of foods

Creative blog uses MRI scanner to look into objects such as vegetables, often with pleasurable results. These captures into animated gifs (as you can see above).

You can check out more at the blog here

[Note - I am not responsible for the above Gifs - they were made by Andy Ellison who runs the blog - the only alteration I have made of them is to optimize and reduce the original file sizes so they can run here. Higher resolution versions can be found at the blog itself]

VOGUE ITALIA // FACE THE FUTURE // GORDON VON STEINER // STEVEN MEISEL from Gordon von Steiner on Vimeo.

freundevonfreunden:

Face the future

A film by Gordon Von Steiner for Vogue Italia

Gordon von Steiner is one of the new upcoming talents in photography and filmmaking. The New York-based fashionista envisions and portrays his ideas in original ways, while high caliber clients become more and more aware of him.

Vogue Italia is one of those clients and asked Steiner to direct a film for their September cover story 2012, shot by Steven Meisel: Face the Future. Featuring the mesmerizing Carolyn Murphy, among with strange absurdities of actual people and dolls, not just a fashion video is presented but as well a film that carries along an important concern of the image’s future.

Marine Snow by Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

A continuous shower of organic matter

‘Marine Snow’ is a series of medium and large porcelain plates based on the natural phenomenon that is found in the deep ocean. It’s a continuous shower of mostly organic matter including dead and dying plants and animals feeding organisms in the layers of the ocean that never see the daylight.

Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters created a series of porcelain plates inspired by this sad but beautiful part of nature. In their search of translating the beauty of water in designs and techniques the duo used the behavior of the ocean to turn an imprint of cobalt and copper glaze into Marine Snow.

The plates will be presented at the solo show Stil Water (Still Water) at Christian Ouwens, Rotterdam. The show opens on the 29th of September 2012.

Source : Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

Frans Dijkmeijer

A life in weaving 

Textile designer Frans Dijkmeijer (Helmond 1936 — Toulouse 2011) is known for his extraordinary mastery of the techniques of weaving. He tirelessly explored the possibilities of different yarns and weaves, researching the physical characteristics of particular yarns, studying the results and reapplying what he had learned. His test swatches provide a kaleidoscopic picture of new weaves and original structures. In this video, filmed in his house and studio in Toulouse only ten days before he suddenly passed away, Dijkmeijer talks about his work, inspiration sources and the endlessly fascinating weaving technique.

The video is made for the exhibition ‘Intervention #19 Frans Dijkmeijer - A Life in Weaving’ in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, which was originally planned for autumn 2011. Because of the death of Frans Dijkmeijer, the exhibition has been postponed and is now on display from 2 June until 30 September 2012.

Source : Museum Boijmans van Beuningen

""Because I know that time is always time, and place is always and only place, and what is actual is actual only for one time, and only for one place" ~ T.S. Elliot"

Egelsee by Thomas Albdorf

"Egelsee" is a body of work that Albdorf developed during "Part - 1", the first part of Vienna-based Men In Space's ongoing collaborative series “Part” that brings together various artists working with different media. All shown photographs and installations were created during 2 days in a previously defined area by Thomas Albdorf, Clemens Haas and Lukas Ipsmiller.

Source : Thomas Albdorf

Image originally posted by :  : R - Mag



Karla Black | At Fault | 2011

Making different configurations with or from mess or formless matter 

Glasgow artist Karla Black makes process-based sculptural pieces, often using familiar domestic materials. Black is interested in exploring material experience as a way of thinking, feeling or communicating without language. She makes work from materials with which she has an intimate, familiar kind of relationship: the substances and surfaces that constitute her everyday life.

Image courtesy of : Modern Art

Karla Black | At Fault | 2011

Making different configurations with or from mess or formless matter 

Glasgow artist Karla Black makes process-based sculptural pieces, often using familiar domestic materials. Black is interested in exploring material experience as a way of thinking, feeling or communicating without language. She makes work from materials with which she has an intimate, familiar kind of relationship: the substances and surfaces that constitute her everyday life.

Image courtesy of : Modern Art


Idolomantis Diabolica

Devil’s Flower Mantis

The Idolomantis Diabolica, sometimes known as the “King of all mantis” for the obvious reason; it’s beauty, size and rarity.

Image : Igor Siwanowicz

Idolomantis Diabolica

Devil’s Flower Mantis

The Idolomantis Diabolica, sometimes known as the “King of all mantis” for the obvious reason; it’s beauty, size and rarity.


Image : Igor Siwanowicz


Edible Project by Diane Leclair Bisson

Investigating sustainability through the medium of food

Canadian designer and researcher Diane Leclair Bisson has developed a number of pieces for her ongoing venture entitled the ‘Edible Project’. Harnessing her studied knowledge in design, humanities and the social sciences Bisson’s investigation brings light to the question of sustainability through the medium of food. the most recent outcome ‘Food Nests’ was conceived through a collaboration with italian food designer Vito Gionatan Lassandro as part of her Taste No Waste Initiative - an inquiry into consumable receptacles that do not need to become waste. This was achieved though a series of container designs that are created entirely from tomatoes to produce crunchy, soft, and jelly-like results. 

 
Source : Designboom

Edible Project by Diane Leclair Bisson

Investigating sustainability through the medium of food

Canadian designer and researcher Diane Leclair Bisson has developed a number of pieces for her ongoing venture entitled the ‘Edible Project’. Harnessing her studied knowledge in design, humanities and the social sciences Bisson’s investigation brings light to the question of sustainability through the medium of food. the most recent outcome ‘Food Nests’ was conceived through a collaboration with italian food designer Vito Gionatan Lassandro as part of her Taste No Waste Initiative - an inquiry into consumable receptacles that do not need to become waste. This was achieved though a series of container designs that are created entirely from tomatoes to produce crunchy, soft, and jelly-like results. 

A collection of translucent bowls moulded from a combination of food grade silicone as well as a mixture of fruit and vegetable ingredients.

Source : Designboom

Swimmer Shaved

The Art of the Close Shave Demonstrated in Fashion Filmmaker Bart Hess’ Sexy Short

The seductive curves of a toned figure are slowly unveiled by the ultimate seamless shave in designer, animator and photographer Bart Hess’s sleek new film. Inspired by the aerodynamic forms of swimmers currently battling it out in the Olympic pool, Hess was aided by a pair of human shavers manipulating a two-meter long blade in turning a mechanical act of grooming into a strangely hypnotic performance. “What is important to me in my work is a sense of estranging,” admits Hess, who added the white bar in post-production to compound the uncanny feel of the film. “I want to show the spectator an image that may not be recognizable right away.” Collaborating on textiles with designers like Ann Sofie Back and Iris van Herpen, and sculpting unique outfits for photographer Nick Knight’s editorials for AnOther Magazine and US Vogue, Hess is known for his experimental treatment of materials, like the 15Ib slime dress created for Lady Gaga’s Born This Way album and video. “Normally within my work I am looking for the limits of a material,” says Hess. “But in this film I was looking for the limits of the shaving ritual by scaling it up to include the whole body.” Here, Hess takes NOWNESS beneath the skin of his shoot. 

via NOWNESS 

Aesop | Morphē

Morphē

A short film by Lucy McRae for Aesop

Aesop’s collaboration with Lucy McRaeMorphē playfully presages a new juncture for science and beauty in a speculative tale that embodies thematic aspects of Mary Shelley’sFrankenstein and Charles Perrault’s Sleeping Beauty.

However, the film departs from these classics by emphasising an adroit marriage of science and nature – an allusion to Aesop’s philosophy and formulations.

via AESOP

La Cura

A project by Studio Toogood with Nivea

'la cura' was a visual antidote to the chaos of the Salone del Mobile, a hospital for the senses where visitors were invited to rebalance through a series of intimate performances.

"There are dreamers and there are realists in this world. You think the dreamers will find the dreamers and the realists will find the realists but more often than not, the opposite is true. You see, the dreamers need the realists to keep them from soaring too close to the sun and the realists, well, without the dreamers, they might not ever get off the ground."

– Modern Family (via vineetkaur)

we-find-wildness:

“I hate design,” Mr. Biesenbach will tell you emphatically. When he travels, he has a habit of stripping his hotel room of anything that moves (furniture, colored pillows, desktop accessories) and stuffing it all into the closet. “It’s a little bit of curatorial disease,” he said. “I like to reduce everything to its original surface.” - Klaus Biesenbach, director of PS1 for the NYTimes