Chair Design

"Chairs are the staple of design, one of the first categories of objects (together with cars) that people all over the world think of when confronted with the "D" word. In a designer’s life, the chair is also a ritual of initiation, the first truly mature challenge that involves the responsibilities that come with the design profession. In chairs, more than in any other designed object, human beings are the unit of measure to which everything must defer—including all economical considerations regarding the manufacturing process and marketing."  ~ Paola Antonelli

full article  

Paper Sculptures by Lauren ClayBehold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website.   
via LinMorris


Paper Sculptures by Lauren Clay

Behold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website. 

image 

image 

via LinMorris

Home is where the heart is.


Home is where the heart is.

“What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning.”
~ T.S. Eliot

“What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning.”

~ T.S. Eliot

themissive:

Untitled by Jen Lee 2011

source

themissive:

Untitled by Jen Lee 2011




source

"Write Drunk, Edit Sober" ~ Ernest Hemmingway

"Write Drunk, Edit Sober" ~ Ernest Hemmingway

Copy/CultureDesign culture is obsessed with authenticity. Copying is often deemed reprehensible, and borrowing another’s idea or incorporating elements of his or her work into one’s own is viewed as a sign of creative impoverishment. But is this right? What’s wrong with interpreting someone else’s creation? Musicians have been quoting each other’s work for centuries – why shouldn’t the same thing happen in other creative disciplines? Where does quotation end and copying begin?
Businesses and creators diligently protect their creative, technical and technological property – rightly so, as large sums are often invested in their development. But is intellectual property protection appropriate in an age of digital distribution, when it’s difficult to identify a product’s author, maker or inventor? And in a culture in which quotation and copying have long led to enrichment and innovation, should these acts be made impossible?via Premsela 


Copy/Culture

Design culture is obsessed with authenticity. Copying is often deemed reprehensible, and borrowing another’s idea or incorporating elements of his or her work into one’s own is viewed as a sign of creative impoverishment. But is this right? What’s wrong with interpreting someone else’s creation? Musicians have been quoting each other’s work for centuries – why shouldn’t the same thing happen in other creative disciplines? Where does quotation end and copying begin?

Businesses and creators diligently protect their creative, technical and technological property – rightly so, as large sums are often invested in their development. But is intellectual property protection appropriate in an age of digital distribution, when it’s difficult to identify a product’s author, maker or inventor? And in a culture in which quotation and copying have long led to enrichment and innovation, should these acts be made impossible?

via Premsela 

Elspeth Diederix - Maquette (2008)Elspeth Diederix (born Nairobi, Kenya, 1971) is an artist who is always on the move. Travelling for her is a way of life. Even though most of her photographs are taken in exotic locations, evidence of this is seldom found in her work. Purposefully she herself remains on the outside. Instead of being absorbed by the setting of her subject, she prefers to maintain a high degree of detachment. This enables her to create a sense of alienation and in her photographs she achieves this by stripping everyday objects of what normally one takes for granted. There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images.website 


Elspeth Diederix - Maquette (2008)

Elspeth Diederix (born Nairobi, Kenya, 1971) is an artist who is always on the move. Travelling for her is a way of life. Even though most of her photographs are taken in exotic locations, evidence of this is seldom found in her work. Purposefully she herself remains on the outside. Instead of being absorbed by the setting of her subject, she prefers to maintain a high degree of detachment. This enables her to create a sense of alienation and in her photographs she achieves this by stripping everyday objects of what normally one takes for granted. There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images.

website

 

Koji Kakiuchi: Gassho'Gassho', a small open-air shelter in Iwate, Japan from japanese architect Koji Kakiuchi / Yaomitsu Designing Department is conceived at a scale of a DIY project. The construction sits on the remaining concrete foundations of homes that were swept away during the March 2011 tsunami, seeking to provide a space for victims to meet and exchange about their past, present and future. Using traditional japanese construction methods, the simple cabin form was derived from the shape of hands joining together in meditation or prayer. The self-structuralizing composition rests on the extruded concrete frames of an old building, providing shelter above the footprint of what once was a room. The surrounding boxes are planted with flowers that will bloom around the wooden shelter with time.  
By providing a simple space of retreat that respects and draws focus to the architectural remnants of the past, the project involves the notion of memory and time into its construct. The simple frames, which took 8 hours to assemble, also encourages similar modest buildings to be built by people and local citizens across the area.  found at Designboom


Koji Kakiuchi: Gassho

'Gassho', a small open-air shelter in Iwate, Japan from japanese architect Koji Kakiuchi / Yaomitsu Designing Department is conceived at a scale of a DIY project. The construction sits on the remaining concrete foundations of homes that were swept away during the March 2011 tsunami, seeking to provide a space for victims to meet and exchange about their past, present and future. 



Using traditional japanese construction methods, the simple cabin form was derived from the shape of hands joining together in meditation or prayer. The self-structuralizing composition rests on the extruded concrete frames of an old building, providing shelter above the footprint of what once was a room. The surrounding boxes are planted with flowers that will bloom around the wooden shelter with time. 

 

By providing a simple space of retreat that respects and draws focus to the architectural remnants of the past, the project involves the notion of memory and time into its construct. The simple frames, which took 8 hours to assemble, also encourages similar modest buildings to be built by people and local citizens across the area.  



found at Designboom


Yoko Ono - Cut Piece

Ono’s work related destruction to interpersonal, often intimate, human relations. This element was particularly thought-provoking in ‹Cut Piece›, one of many actions she did as DIAS [Destruction in Art Symposium]. Ono had first done the performance in 1964, in Japan, and again at Carnegie Hall, in New York, in 1965. Ono sat motionless on the stage after inviting the audience to come up and cut away her clothing, covering her breasts at the moemnt of unbosoming. ‹Cut Piece› entailed a disrobing, a denouement of the reciprocity between exhibitionism and scopic desires, between victim and assailant, between sadist and masochist: and, as a heterosexual herselft, Ono unveiled the gendered relationship of male and female subjects as objects for each other. 



more info here 

Helmut Lang: Make it Hard | The Fashion Legend on His Renegade Act of Artistic ReinventionIconic designer turned artist Helmut Lang shredded 20 years of fashion history for his last exhibition, repurposing 6,000 garments from his eponymous label into a series of terrestrially textured, stalactite columns that stretch from floor to ceiling. On view at the Fireplace Project in East Hampton, Make it Hard comprises 16 sculptures that meld natural and synthetic fibers with plastics, metals, leathers, fur, feathers and even hair. “The fight against entropy and decay is always going to be a losing battle,” says international curator Neville Wakefield. “So why not make of that destructive energy something new?” It should be noted that Lang’s most adored designs were saved from the cut, when in 2009 and 2010 the designer donated a large volume of his work to select fashion, design and contemporary art collections worldwide. A leading figure of 90s minimalism, the Austrian-born Lang has left a lasting mark on the industry. Following his brand’s acquisition by the Prada Group six years ago, Lang relocated to a Long Island studio to focus on his artistic career. “In the autobiographical sense, the material of people’s lives has always been the subject of their art,” says Wakefield. “The only difference here is the level of identification and investment that the public has in that material.” Nowness has asked Lang about his dramatic endeavor. Read the article here 

Helmut Lang: Make it Hard | The Fashion Legend on His Renegade Act of Artistic Reinvention

Iconic designer turned artist Helmut Lang shredded 20 years of fashion history for his last exhibition, repurposing 6,000 garments from his eponymous label into a series of terrestrially textured, stalactite columns that stretch from floor to ceiling. On view at the Fireplace Project in East Hampton, Make it Hard comprises 16 sculptures that meld natural and synthetic fibers with plastics, metals, leathers, fur, feathers and even hair. “The fight against entropy and decay is always going to be a losing battle,” says international curator Neville Wakefield. “So why not make of that destructive energy something new?” It should be noted that Lang’s most adored designs were saved from the cut, when in 2009 and 2010 the designer donated a large volume of his work to select fashion, design and contemporary art collections worldwide. A leading figure of 90s minimalism, the Austrian-born Lang has left a lasting mark on the industry. Following his brand’s acquisition by the Prada Group six years ago, Lang relocated to a Long Island studio to focus on his artistic career. “In the autobiographical sense, the material of people’s lives has always been the subject of their art,” says Wakefield. “The only difference here is the level of identification and investment that the public has in that material.” Nowness has asked Lang about his dramatic endeavor. 

Read the article here 

we-find-wildness:

Ceramic vases made in West Germany from 1960-1980
From Nicolas Trembley’s personal collection

we-find-wildness:

Ceramic vases made in West Germany from 1960-1980

From Nicolas Trembley’s personal collection

Ways Of Seeing

"In the cities in which we live, all of us see hundreds of publicity images every day of our lives. No other kind of image confronts us so frequently. In no other form of society in history has there been such a concentration of images, such a density of visual messages.

One may remember or forget these messages but briefly one takes them in, and for a moment they stimulate the imagination by way of either memory or expectation. The publicity image belongs to the moment. We see it as we turn a page, as we turn a corner, as a vehicle passes us. Or we see it on a television screen while waiting for the commercial break to end. Publicity images also belong to the moment in the sense that they must be continually renewed and made up-to-date. Yet they never speak of the present. Often they refer to the past and always they speak of the future.

We are now so accustomed to being addressed by these images that we scarcely notice their total impact. A person may notice a particular image or piece of information because it corresponds to some particular interest he has. But we accept the total system of publicity images as we accept an element of climate. For example, the fact that these images belong to the moment but speak of the future produces a strange effect which has become so familiar that we scarcely notice it. Usually it is we who pass the image - walking, travelling, turning a page; on the TV screen it is somewhat different but even then we are theoretically the active agent - we can look away, turn down the sound, make some coffee. Yet despite this, one has the impression that publicity images are continually passing us, like express trains on their way to some distant terminus. We are static; they are dynamic - until the newspaper is thrown away, the television program continues or the paster is posted over.”

excerpt from Ways Of Seeing by John Berger

Louis-Léopold Boilly | Still-Life of Flowers in a Glass Vase | 1790 - 1795

Louis-Léopold Boilly | Still-Life of Flowers in a Glass Vase | 1790 - 1795

freundevonfreunden:
HUH Magazine - Plastic Rooms by Penique Productions
The Spanish art collective Penique Productions produce work all centered around the same idea - entirely lining various rooms and environments with brightly coloured plastic. Venues include flats in London, the Museum of Mexico City, and gallery spaces in Spain. (via HUH)

freundevonfreunden:


HUH Magazine - Plastic Rooms by Penique Productions

The Spanish art collective Penique Productions produce work all centered around the same idea - entirely lining various rooms and environments with brightly coloured plastic. Venues include flats in London, the Museum of Mexico City, and gallery spaces in Spain. (via HUH)