Saving cultural heritage goes beyond safeguarding our past and protecting what is magnificent, impressive and beautiful. Rescuing cultural heritage is also an integral part of humanitarian aid, given the importance of rebuilding the social and cultural identity of the community, in which the mosque, the synagogue, the church, monuments or other key buildings play a central role.  - H R H Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands (Honorary chairman of the Prince Claus Funds, Amsterdam, the Netherlands)Link 

Saving cultural heritage goes beyond safeguarding our past and protecting what is magnificent, impressive and beautiful. Rescuing cultural heritage is also an integral part of humanitarian aid, given the importance of rebuilding the social and cultural identity of the community, in which the mosque, the synagogue, the church, monuments or other key buildings play a central role.  

- H R H Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands (Honorary chairman of the Prince Claus Funds, Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Link 

Kirstie van Noort - Ceramic Work
Coloured Bowls 1st Edition
"These bowls made out of porcelain are the result of a half year experimenting with oxides and porcelain clay. My goal was to get new colours by mixing different types of oxides.for this research i used cupper-, nickel-, chromium-, manganese-, and cobaltoxide. By mixing these oxides with white porcelain in different percentages you get different grades of a colour.
After making small series with the oxides I was fascinated by the colours they have and the sound they make. I decided to make them bigger. And while working with the bigger bowls i discovered that the influence of different oxides is very big. The bowls have their own, new unique form and colours, which I think is beautiful.”
website:  Kirstie van Noort

Kirstie van Noort - Ceramic Work


Coloured Bowls 1st Edition

"These bowls made out of porcelain are the result of a half year experimenting with oxides and porcelain clay. My goal was to get new colours by mixing different types of oxides.
for this research i used cupper-, nickel-, chromium-, manganese-, and cobaltoxide. By mixing these oxides with white porcelain in different percentages you get different grades of a colour.

After making small series with the oxides I was fascinated by the colours they have and the sound they make. I decided to make them bigger. And while working with the bigger bowls i discovered that the influence of different oxides is very big. The bowls have their own, new unique form and colours, which I think is beautiful.”

website:  Kirstie van Noort

Amethyst by Koen HauserAmethyst is a site-specific installation with images and sound. Slowly dissolving slides reminisce the process of decay. The automated slideshow is projected in a dimly lit but richly decorated room, the visual style of the imagery referring to fashion photography.Koen Hauser created this work on the occasion of Salon/1, by whom he was invited to show his work in Museum van Loon during the Amsterdam Fashion Week 2010.website Koen Hauservia RMag 


Amethyst by Koen Hauser


Amethyst is a site-specific installation with images and sound. Slowly dissolving slides reminisce the process of decay. The automated slideshow is projected in a dimly lit but richly decorated room, the visual style of the imagery referring to fashion photography.



Koen Hauser created this work on the occasion of Salon/1, by whom he was invited to show his work in Museum van Loon during the Amsterdam Fashion Week 2010.




website Koen Hauser

via RMag 

Jim HodgesJim Hodges’ latest, two-part exhibition has opened at the Gladstone Gallery in New York City — mounted across both gallery spaces in Chelsea. For the last two decades, Hodges has utilized a broad range of materials  — both precious and commonplace — to transform quotidian objects into reflective sculptures. Merging the personal, political and universal, Hodges seeks to evince the immemorial; timeless discourses of identity, loss, mortality and love. 
Using manipulated, mirror-like elements — inspired by his recent trip to India — Hodges features a greater focus on color, saturation and performance. His artwork creates a space for introspection, investigating notions of time, movement, and imagination. Employing organic shapes and synthetic materials, Hodges’ sculptures exemplify the importance of cross-disciplinary creation and analysis.via TrendTablet 


Jim Hodges


Jim Hodges’ latest, two-part exhibition has opened at the Gladstone Gallery in New York City — mounted across both gallery spaces in Chelsea. For the last two decades, Hodges has utilized a broad range of materials  — both precious and commonplace — to transform quotidian objects into reflective sculptures. Merging the personal, political and universal, Hodges seeks to evince the immemorial; timeless discourses of identity, loss, mortality and love.

 

Using manipulated, mirror-like elements — inspired by his recent trip to India — Hodges features a greater focus on color, saturation and performance. His artwork creates a space for introspection, investigating notions of time, movement, and imagination. Employing organic shapes and synthetic materials, Hodges’ sculptures exemplify the importance of cross-disciplinary creation and analysis.

via TrendTablet

 

themissive:

“…within the imagery you have a kind of ‘ideological failure’, [which] is how I put it. I look out for that, I mess around with it because I think it makes you question not only an artwork, but also an image, and with that reality and truth.”
A2 by Michaël Borremans 2004[read interview]

themissive:

“…within the imagery you have a kind of ‘ideological failure’, [which] is how I put it. I look out for that, I mess around with it because I think it makes you question not only an artwork, but also an image, and with that reality and truth.”

A2 by Michaël Borremans 2004
[read interview]

Foam | What’s Next? - A Search Into The Future Of Photography

Join the discussion on foam.org/whatsnext#


Hussein Chalayan Shows A New Image Of The Body

We’ve seen what avant-garde British fashion designer Hussein Chalayan can do with technology and clothing—we’ll never forget that feeling of awe and fascination when we first saw his S/S 2007 line of animatronic dresses (which zipped, flipped and reconfigured right before our eyes), or the pixelated LED dresses from F/W 2007 and the laser dresses from S/S 2008, the latter two of which were made in collaboration with CreatorMoritz Waldemeyer.

Then again, perhaps it comes as no surprise that in the forward-thinking world of fashion, designers would be experimenting with technology. After all, as Chalayan says, “Technology is really the only thing through which you can do new things.”

For his S/S 2012 presentation in Paris this September, The Creators Project collaborated with the fashion mogul in order to shake things up a bit.

excerpt from thecreatorsproject.com

 

themissive:

Plastic 40 by Heidi Leverty

"It is common to associate recycling with words like garbage, junk, maybe even mess and chaos, but behind the discarded items beautiful textures, shapes and colors can be found. Photographer Heidi Leverty has used discarded objects as her primary focus of study from behind the lens for the past eight years, bringing out beauty in what would be considered the end-of-the-line items that have been tossed away. " ~  vertical-review.com

themissive:

Plastic 40 by Heidi Leverty


"It is common to associate recycling with words like garbage, junk, maybe even mess and chaos, but behind the discarded items beautiful textures, shapes and colors can be found. Photographer Heidi Leverty has used discarded objects as her primary focus of study from behind the lens for the past eight years, bringing out beauty in what would be considered the end-of-the-line items that have been tossed away. " ~  vertical-review.com


Lucas Maassen & Sons Furniture Factory.

Lucas Maassen has employed his 3 sons, Thijme (9), Julian (7) and Maris (7). His Sons are responsible for the paint job of the furniture which is build in the factory. They get paid 1 Euro for every piece of furniture they paint. As agreed by the contract they signed.



Due to Dutch child labour laws it is only possible for Thijme, Julian and Maris to work for 3 hours a week. As a result of this the production speed has became a crucial factor in the process. Time limitations are set, they contribute to the typical LM&S aesthetics.



All furniture is build by hand and painted by hand.

more information about this project here

Still life, flowers in a blue jug oil on canvas painting by Van Diemonian (Tasmanian) artist and convict William Buelow Gould (1801 - 1853).Painted c1840 after Gould had received his Certificate of freedom.It is signed in the lower left corner “W.B.Gould, Painter”.Actual size (framed) 690 x 560 mm.source : wikipedia 


Still life, flowers in a blue jug
 

oil on canvas painting by Van Diemonian (Tasmanian) artist and convict William Buelow Gould (1801 - 1853).
Painted c1840 after Gould had received his Certificate of freedom.
It is signed in the lower left corner “W.B.Gould, Painter”.
Actual size (framed) 690 x 560 mm.

source : wikipedia 

Ryan Hope: Permanent Ink on Nowness.com.


Ryan Hope: Permanent Ink

A New Film for Dasha Zhukova Reveals the Passion Driving the Tattoo Scene

Internationally renowned tattooist Mo Coppoletta divulges the personal significances of being inked in this intricate profile by filmmaker Ryan Hope. Owner of influential London parlor A Family Business, Coppoletta has turned his dedication into a lifestyle, making international pilgrimages to be tattooed by those at the pinnacle of the craft.

Today’s short is an exclusive extract from Hope’s documentary Skin, which follows five skin-art collectors on their journey to be tattooed with designs created by major contemporary artists Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Raymond Pettibon, Jake and Dinos Chapman, and Richard Prince.  

via nowness 

Book : DIY Furniture: A Step-by-Step Guide by Christopher StuartFeaturing 30 designs by leading designer-makers from around the world DIY Furniture shows you how to use simple techniques to make stunning designer furniture from scratch. All the projects can be easily assembled using the step-by-step guides from common materials which can be found at the local hardware store. Along with designs for seating and storage, the book also features projects for making your own bed, wardrobe, lighting and garden furniture. Each project features hand-drawn diagrams with short, easy-to-follow instructions on how to build the piece. Whether building from scratch or customizing existing designs, DIY Furniture allows you to create unique designer pieces at a fraction of the normal cost. Brief biographies of all the featured designers are included at the end of the book. Sight Unseen excerpted one of the book’s easiest-to-follow projects, Brass Ensemble by London designer Jorre Van Ast and to top that they are giving away 2 copies.
read further article on Sight Unseen 


Book : DIY Furniture: A Step-by-Step Guide by Christopher Stuart

Featuring 30 designs by leading designer-makers from around the world DIY Furniture shows you how to use simple techniques to make stunning designer furniture from scratch. All the projects can be easily assembled using the step-by-step guides from common materials which can be found at the local hardware store. Along with designs for seating and storage, the book also features projects for making your own bed, wardrobe, lighting and garden furniture. Each project features hand-drawn diagrams with short, easy-to-follow instructions on how to build the piece. Whether building from scratch or customizing existing designs, DIY Furniture allows you to create unique designer pieces at a fraction of the normal cost. Brief biographies of all the featured designers are included at the end of the book. 

Sight Unseen excerpted one of the book’s easiest-to-follow projects, Brass Ensemble by London designer Jorre Van Ast and to top that they are giving away 2 copies.


read further article on Sight Unseen

 


BK Farmyards


Urban NYC farmers have set their eyes on a new prize: transforming privately owned backyards into lush, fruitful farmlands. 

By signing up to share your yard with a urban farmer, you can eat fresh from your own personal farm during the harvest months, and even sell produce to your neighbors - growing a community built around fresh local food. The best part is, you don’t even have to lift a finger, BK Farmyards does all the farming for you…

Find out more at bkfarmyards.com 

Shelter by Henny van NistelrooyShelter is a collection of space dividers composed of Bute fabrics, meticulously unthreaded in to new geometrical patterns.

In response to the brief “Shelter” by JJAM Curators Collective for London Design Festival, Henny van Nistelrooy has developed a collection of space dividers. The collection makes original use of the fabrics supported by renowned Scottish textile manufacturer Bute Fabrics. In reaction to the machine woven structures Henny has been unthreading the fabrics by hand in order to create new geometrical designs within the fabric. By doing this the tightly woven, opaque textile become translucent and the relation between the different threads that make up the fabrics becomes clear.

The project has been inspired by a recent journey Henny made to China. Here the beautiful architectural features appearing in many Ming/Qing imperial palaces and gardens have been of influence in the use of color and shape. These space-dividing screens reflect the geometrical shapes of some of the many windows that can be found in the many historic buildings I visited during my trips to Beijing, Hangzhou and Suzhou.


Materials:
Bute textiles, various wool
Poplar

Dimensions:
Mustard circle: 120 cm diameter

Commission from:
JJAM Curators Collective

Supported by:

Bute Fabrics 
website via Design.nl 


Shelter by Henny van Nistelrooy

Shelter is a collection of space dividers composed of Bute fabrics, meticulously unthreaded in to new geometrical patterns.
In response to the brief “Shelter” by JJAM Curators Collective for London Design Festival, Henny van Nistelrooy has developed a collection of space dividers. The collection makes original use of the fabrics supported by renowned Scottish textile manufacturer Bute Fabrics. In reaction to the machine woven structures Henny has been unthreading the fabrics by hand in order to create new geometrical designs within the fabric. By doing this the tightly woven, opaque textile become translucent and the relation between the different threads that make up the fabrics becomes clear.
The project has been inspired by a recent journey Henny made to China. Here the beautiful architectural features appearing in many Ming/Qing imperial palaces and gardens have been of influence in the use of color and shape. These space-dividing screens reflect the geometrical shapes of some of the many windows that can be found in the many historic buildings I visited during my trips to Beijing, Hangzhou and Suzhou.

Materials:
Bute textiles, various wool
Poplar

Dimensions:
Mustard circle: 120 cm diameter

Commission from:
JJAM Curators Collective

Supported by:

Bute Fabrics 


website

via Design.nl 

Narciso by Giorgia Zanellato
Narciso is a project which started with the intention of designing some vases, focusing on the functionality of the vase as an object. But what is the function of a vase? They are used to display flowers. Narciso is a collection of six different vases which use mirrors to draw attention to the role of the flowers. Mirrors are investigated in all their aspects, from the simplest reflection to the most complex one. In this way each vase shows flowers from a different point of view. They’re made in borosilicate glass, powder-coated aluminum and mirrored stainless steel.website 


Narciso by 
Giorgia Zanellato

Narciso is a project which started with the intention of designing some vases, focusing on the functionality of the vase as an object. But what is the function of a vase? They are used to display flowers. Narciso is a collection of six different vases which use mirrors to draw attention to the role of the flowers. Mirrors are investigated in all their aspects, from the simplest reflection to the most complex one. In this way each vase shows flowers from a different point of view. They’re made in borosilicate glass, powder-coated aluminum and mirrored stainless steel.

website