Three Transitions by Peter Campus

Introspective self-portraits that incorporate the artist’s dry humor

In Three Transitions, Peter Campus presents three introspective self-portraits that incorporate his dry humor. He begins with an image created by two cameras facing opposite sides of a paper wall and filming simultaneously. His back to one camera, Campus cuts through the paper. In the double image, it appears as if he is cutting through his back, which is both disconcerting and tongue-in-cheek. Campus then uses the “chroma–key effect” of superimposing one video image onto a similarly colored area of another image. He applies blue paint to his face, and during this process another image of himself is revealed; he then superimposes his image on a piece of blue paper, which he sets afire. AsThree Transitions moves between deadpan humor and seeming self-destruction, Campus explores the limits of visual perception as a measure of reality.

Peter Campus, (born 1937) is an American born artist, known for his interactive and single channel video work of the early 1970s, alongside an extensive body of photographic and digital video works to the present day. His work is widely collected by major museums and galleries, including the MoMA in New York, the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim MuseumTate Modern, the Renia Sofia and the Centre Pompidou. 

Source : MOMA | Wikipedia

Via : Prosthetic Knowledge

freundevonfreunden:

Face the future

A film by Gordon Von Steiner for Vogue Italia

Gordon von Steiner is one of the new upcoming talents in photography and filmmaking. The New York-based fashionista envisions and portrays his ideas in original ways, while high caliber clients become more and more aware of him.

Vogue Italia is one of those clients and asked Steiner to direct a film for their September cover story 2012, shot by Steven Meisel: Face the Future. Featuring the mesmerizing Carolyn Murphy, among with strange absurdities of actual people and dolls, not just a fashion video is presented but as well a film that carries along an important concern of the image’s future.

Marine Snow by Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

A continuous shower of organic matter

‘Marine Snow’ is a series of medium and large porcelain plates based on the natural phenomenon that is found in the deep ocean. It’s a continuous shower of mostly organic matter including dead and dying plants and animals feeding organisms in the layers of the ocean that never see the daylight.

Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters created a series of porcelain plates inspired by this sad but beautiful part of nature. In their search of translating the beauty of water in designs and techniques the duo used the behavior of the ocean to turn an imprint of cobalt and copper glaze into Marine Snow.

The plates will be presented at the solo show Stil Water (Still Water) at Christian Ouwens, Rotterdam. The show opens on the 29th of September 2012.

Source : Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

""Because I know that time is always time, and place is always and only place, and what is actual is actual only for one time, and only for one place" ~ T.S. Elliot"

Egelsee by Thomas Albdorf

"Egelsee" is a body of work that Albdorf developed during "Part - 1", the first part of Vienna-based Men In Space's ongoing collaborative series “Part” that brings together various artists working with different media. All shown photographs and installations were created during 2 days in a previously defined area by Thomas Albdorf, Clemens Haas and Lukas Ipsmiller.

Source : Thomas Albdorf

Image originally posted by :  : R - Mag



Karla Black | At Fault | 2011

Making different configurations with or from mess or formless matter 

Glasgow artist Karla Black makes process-based sculptural pieces, often using familiar domestic materials. Black is interested in exploring material experience as a way of thinking, feeling or communicating without language. She makes work from materials with which she has an intimate, familiar kind of relationship: the substances and surfaces that constitute her everyday life.

Image courtesy of : Modern Art

Karla Black | At Fault | 2011

Making different configurations with or from mess or formless matter 

Glasgow artist Karla Black makes process-based sculptural pieces, often using familiar domestic materials. Black is interested in exploring material experience as a way of thinking, feeling or communicating without language. She makes work from materials with which she has an intimate, familiar kind of relationship: the substances and surfaces that constitute her everyday life.

Image courtesy of : Modern Art

La Cura

A project by Studio Toogood with Nivea

'la cura' was a visual antidote to the chaos of the Salone del Mobile, a hospital for the senses where visitors were invited to rebalance through a series of intimate performances.

Willem van Aelst: “Still Life with Flowers”

Willem van Aelst: “Still Life with Flowers”

Valérie Buess: Paper SculpturesValérie Buess is a swiss artist who lives in Germany. For the last twenty years she has worked primarily with paper creating intricate sculptures that often resemble urchins, coral and other underwater life.Check her website for more work. 


Valérie Buess: Paper Sculptures

Valérie Buess is a swiss artist who lives in Germany. For the last twenty years she has worked primarily with paper creating intricate sculptures that often resemble urchins, coral and other underwater life.

Check her website for more work. 

Hello by Matthijs Vlot

Sooner than Later
Sanded World Globe12”x12”2011by Augustina Woodgate

Sooner than Later
Sanded World Globe
12”x12”
2011

by Augustina Woodgate

we-find-wildness:

by Franz Erhard Walther

Since the early 1960s, German artist FRANZ ERHARD WALTHER has created objects or ‘instruments‘ out of fabric that people could manipulate to increase their awareness of time, space and the human body. His work is therefore not an autonomous, independent work; it becomes a tool that invites the viewer to become its user. If the viewer accepts the invitation, a sculpture arises in the interaction between user and object.read further article here 

we-find-wildness:

by Franz Erhard Walther

Since the early 1960s, German artist FRANZ ERHARD WALTHER has created objects or ‘instruments‘ out of fabric that people could manipulate to increase their awareness of time, space and the human body. His work is therefore not an autonomous, independent work; it becomes a tool that invites the viewer to become its user. If the viewer accepts the invitation, a sculpture arises in the interaction between user and object.

read further article here 

alecshao:

Mary Ann Wakeley, Peacing the Precipice 

alecshao:

Mary Ann Wakeley, Peacing the Precipice 

Blackfield by Zadok Ben David
London-based artist Zadok Ben David planted more than 12,000 painted stainless steel cut plants in sand to create this installation titled Blackfield. The steel cut plants, inspired by Victorian botanical illustrations in textbooks, were placed in a bed of sand to make them look as though they were growing from the ground. 
At first glance, Blackfield looks plain, but upon further inspection what initially appears black is actually colorful on the other side. There is also a miniature boxed version of this installation where the back wall of the box is a mirror - allowing the viewer to see both the colorful side and the black side of the plant structures simultaneously.via Colossal 


Blackfield by Zadok Ben David

London-based artist Zadok Ben David planted more than 12,000 painted stainless steel cut plants in sand to create this installation titled Blackfield. The steel cut plants, inspired by Victorian botanical illustrations in textbooks, were placed in a bed of sand to make them look as though they were growing from the ground.

 

At first glance, Blackfield looks plain, but upon further inspection what initially appears black is actually colorful on the other side. There is also a miniature boxed version of this installation where the back wall of the box is a mirror - allowing the viewer to see both the colorful side and the black side of the plant structures simultaneously.



via Colossal 

The nine decades of Yayoi Kusama’s life have taken her from rural Japan to the New York art scene to contemporary Tokyo, in a career in which she has continuously innovated and re-invented her style. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as “Accumulations”, to her “Infinity Net” paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns. Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessively charged vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space.
Yayoi Kusama
9 February  –  5 June 2012Tate Modern

The nine decades of Yayoi Kusama’s life have taken her from rural Japan to the New York art scene to contemporary Tokyo, in a career in which she has continuously innovated and re-invented her style. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as “Accumulations”, to her “Infinity Net” paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns. Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessively charged vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space.



9 February – 5 June 2012

Tate Modern

Paper Sculptures by Lauren ClayBehold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website.   
via LinMorris


Paper Sculptures by Lauren Clay

Behold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website. 

image 

image 

via LinMorris