Gabriel Dawe : Plexus no. 10The National Centre for Craft & Design presents the UK premiere appearance of artist Gabriel Dawe, Plexus No. 10. Currently working and residing in Dallas and born and raised in Mexico City, Dawe creates fields of chromatic filaments that spatially manifest their ephemerality. Materialising the Structure of Light centres around a new commission from the artist’s awe-inspiring Plexus series. Having just wrapped Plexus No. 9 at PEEL Gallery in Houston, Dawe creates his most ambitious effort yet with Plexus No. 10. Developing out of the artist’s practice of embroidering on clothing, and inspired by the traditional richly hued embroidery of his native Mexico, the Plexus installations use colour to dazzling effect. Utilising rainbow hued Gütterman thread to produce a disorientating effect reminiscent of Op Art, the installation will transform the entire Main Gallery. Giant veils of shimmering colour and line, stretching from floor to ceiling, will create an immersive environment which visitors will be invited to walk through, experience, and contemplate.After an initial career as a graphic designer, Dawe started experimenting and creating artwork which eventually led him to explore textiles and embroidery—activities traditionally associated with women and which were forbidden for a boy growing up in Mexico. Here, the use of embroidery—albeit on a huge scale—renders the work subversive of notions of masculinity and machismo that are so ingrained in his culture. As a male artist working with inherently ‘female’ materials, Dawe implies that traditional gender roles may be learned rather than natural, and can therefore be rejected. Similarly, installation straddles the boundaries between textiles, architecture and sculpture.Citing Anish Kapoor as a major influence, Dawe creates complex and often vertigo inducing spatial structures, which direct the viewer through space. Accordingly, they emulate the invisible forces which shape our existence; the social norms, rules and expectations which determine who we are.This installation makes the intangible visible, giving form to structures which exist at the very edges of our comprehension.
website : Gabriel Dawevia Domus


Gabriel Dawe : Plexus no. 10

The National Centre for Craft & Design presents the UK premiere appearance of artist Gabriel Dawe, Plexus No. 10. Currently working and residing in Dallas and born and raised in Mexico City, Dawe creates fields of chromatic filaments that spatially manifest their ephemerality. 

Materialising the Structure of Light centres around a new commission from the artist’s awe-inspiring Plexus series. Having just wrapped Plexus No. 9 at PEEL Gallery in Houston, Dawe creates his most ambitious effort yet with Plexus No. 10. Developing out of the artist’s practice of embroidering on clothing, and inspired by the traditional richly hued embroidery of his native Mexico, the Plexus installations use colour to dazzling effect. Utilising rainbow hued Gütterman thread to produce a disorientating effect reminiscent of Op Art, the installation will transform the entire Main Gallery. Giant veils of shimmering colour and line, stretching from floor to ceiling, will create an immersive environment which visitors will be invited to walk through, experience, and contemplate.

After an initial career as a graphic designer, Dawe started experimenting and creating artwork which eventually led him to explore textiles and embroidery—activities traditionally associated with women and which were forbidden for a boy growing up in Mexico. Here, the use of embroidery—albeit on a huge scale—renders the work subversive of notions of masculinity and machismo that are so ingrained in his culture. As a male artist working with inherently ‘female’ materials, Dawe implies that traditional gender roles may be learned rather than natural, and can therefore be rejected. Similarly, installation straddles the boundaries between textiles, architecture and sculpture.

Citing Anish Kapoor as a major influence, Dawe creates complex and often vertigo inducing spatial structures, which direct the viewer through space. Accordingly, they emulate the invisible forces which shape our existence; the social norms, rules and expectations which determine who we are.

This installation makes the intangible visible, giving form to structures which exist at the very edges of our comprehension.

website : Gabriel Dawe

via Domus


Karen and Christian Boros | Manager and Art Collector, Penthouse, Berlin-Mitte

In the Boros residence – a former Second World War air raid shelter built in 1942 in central Berlin – visitors can easily lose their way in the maze-like corridors of bare concrete.

Bullet holes from the Second World War testify the historical significance of the building. The heart of this hermetic concrete cube contains an exhibition of contemporary works from the private collection of ad agency founder and publisher, Christian Boros. In order to create a suitable space for the collection, architect Jens Casper deconstructed the 3,000 square meter bunker, which was once devoid of natural light, transforming it into a complex room arrangement. The glass superstructure of the penthouse is the polar opposite of the cube’s massiness.

There, Christian and his wife, Karen, live with their son amidst paintings by Elizabeth Peyton and a series of installations by groundbreaking artists such as Olafur Eliasson. It is a dream home that once seemed impossible to realize, but has now become an art manifesto for Berlin’s historical Mitte district, where change is the norm.

Site : Sammlung Boros

source : Freunde Von Freunden  via Today and Tomorrow

Humans Since 1982: Collection Of Light
Stockholm-based designers Humans Since 1982 have created ‘Collection Of Light’. Each light bulb has been categorized and organized, framed in repurposed 70 year old insect collection drawers in order to accomplish the visual harmony and systematic arrangement of a true series. Each piece is an assembly of LED lights labeled by size, name, color and temperature. The glass framed electrical components have been manufactured in a hand-made, limited edition series.  The body of work includes three lighting objects: a 300 LED display with 3 editions, and smaller 150 and 90 LED displays with 10 versions each. via Designboom 


Humans Since 1982: Collection Of Light

Stockholm-based designers Humans Since 1982 have created ‘Collection Of Light’. Each light bulb has been categorized and organized, framed in repurposed 70 year old insect collection drawers in order to accomplish the visual harmony and systematic arrangement 
of a true series. Each piece is an assembly of LED lights labeled by size, name, color and temperature. 

The glass framed electrical components have been manufactured in a hand-made, limited edition series.  T
he body of work includes three lighting objects: a 300 LED display with 3 editions, and smaller 150 and 90 LED displays with 10 versions each. 

via Designboom 

Dr. Annelid (Green) 2010 by Angelika ArendtAngelika Arendt is an artist based out of Berlin, Germany. Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of painted polyurethane. 


Dr. Annelid (Green) 2010 by Angelika Arendt

Angelika Arendt
 is an artist based out of Berlin, Germany. Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of painted polyurethane.

 

IN SILENCE by Chiharu Shiota 

Chiharu Shiota, born in Osaka in 1972, has been living since 1999 in Berlin. In performances and installations she is preoccupied with remembrance and oblivion. Earth and water recall the lasting and the fleeting. There is a concern with drifting between the cultures of Asia and Europe as also with a farewell to childhood.

The young Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota deals generously with her dreams. Her installations and performances lead into sleep, night and the self-forgetfulness of the dreaming body. Far from Japan, her loss of orientation and her fear of losing the personal and individual have become the leitmotifs of her art. From them arise theatrical images inviting viewers´ participation."Maybe I am unable without fretting to create more art, and if I am unable to create more art, I become more fretful," so she once wrote. But just as a story-teller keeps the spooks of the night at a distance, she bans fear from her works. In her installations she has wound herself in black woollen threads like in a cocoon. In her exhibitions she has slept between a bed and the surrounding walls among these threads forming an impenetrable thicket. The spatial complex of black lines was both threatening and comforting and offered protection and stability. But the lines also created labyrinthine structures, calling at every point for new decisions. Anxiety at the end of childhood was just as much woven into them as were metaphors for a technology giving contemporary life its contours. Electronic webs, neural channels, personal relationships: From all sides folk nowadays are called upon to be flexible.Biographical and cultural transformations come into contact in her works. “Memories can´t be rinsed away”, she claims. She translates resistance to the flow of time into poetical and memorable images. In the installation “Under the Skin” eight items of clothing hang above a washing basin and reach nearly to the ceiling. They hold each others´ arms like eight sisters from a fairytale with an adventure to undergo. Soil clings to, and water drips from the items. They have already come a long way, and smears and smudges bear witness to their experiences.
via Culturebase


IN SILENCE by Chiharu Shiota

 
Chiharu Shiota, born in Osaka in 1972, has been living since 1999 in Berlin. In performances and installations she is preoccupied with remembrance and oblivion. Earth and water recall the lasting and the fleeting. There is a concern with drifting between the cultures of Asia and Europe as also with a farewell to childhood.

The young Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota deals generously with her dreams. Her installations and performances lead into sleep, night and the self-forgetfulness of the dreaming body. Far from Japan, her loss of orientation and her fear of losing the personal and individual have become the leitmotifs of her art. From them arise theatrical images inviting viewers´ participation.

"Maybe I am unable without fretting to create more art, and if I am unable to create more art, I become more fretful," so she once wrote. But just as a story-teller keeps the spooks of the night at a distance, she bans fear from her works. In her installations she has wound herself in black woollen threads like in a cocoon. In her exhibitions she has slept between a bed and the surrounding walls among these threads forming an impenetrable thicket. The spatial complex of black lines was both threatening and comforting and offered protection and stability. But the lines also created labyrinthine structures, calling at every point for new decisions. Anxiety at the end of childhood was just as much woven into them as were metaphors for a technology giving contemporary life its contours. Electronic webs, neural channels, personal relationships: From all sides folk nowadays are called upon to be flexible.

Biographical and cultural transformations come into contact in her works. “Memories can´t be rinsed away”, she claims. She translates resistance to the flow of time into poetical and memorable images. In the installation “Under the Skin” eight items of clothing hang above a washing basin and reach nearly to the ceiling. They hold each others´ arms like eight sisters from a fairytale with an adventure to undergo. Soil clings to, and water drips from the items. They have already come a long way, and smears and smudges bear witness to their experiences.

via Culturebase

UNSPUN by Dana Barnes
Textile designer and artist Dana Barnes sure knows how to tie a knot. Her latest work, UNSPUN: Tangled and Fused experiments with unspun natural fibers and innovative felting processes. Barnes explores different ways of forming objects using various techniques: knotting, netting, twisting and looping of fibers to create large scale textile art pieces for interior spaces. Inspired by nature, her work references thick crop fields, grazed hills and meadows, gnarled and knobby aged oak trees, and entwined and interlocked Spanish moss. via Design Milk


UNSPUN by Dana Barnes

Textile designer and artist Dana Barnes sure knows how to tie a knot. Her latest work, UNSPUN: Tangled and Fused experiments with unspun natural fibers and innovative felting processes. Barnes explores different ways of forming objects using various techniques: knotting, netting, twisting and looping of fibers to create large scale textile art pieces for interior spaces. Inspired by nature, her work references thick crop fields, grazed hills and meadows, gnarled and knobby aged oak trees, and entwined and interlocked Spanish moss. 

via Design Milk


Trailer | Space Is Process : A Documentary about Olafur Eliasson


The filmmakers Henrik Lundø and Jacob Jørgensen follow the at once speed-talking academic and shy artist for five years, trying to understand the implications of Olafur and his mission: creating installations that change the space around us and and thereby the mindset in us.Light, space and perception are the key to his works that become fully realized only in their encounter with the observer. Olafur Eliasson demonstrates these ideas himself in vignettes using the cinema screen as optical aid. What results is Inspiring, playful, and thought-provoking, and simply a sight for sore eyes, in more than one way.

"When I make something, which maybe is a work of art, I want this to be in the world. I want it to be sincerely and honestly and responsibly in the world. I want it to have an impact somehow." ~ Olafur Eliasson

Distribution

Ideal museums | An Art Report by Massimiliano Gioni
An overview of the most interesting museum models around the world leads to the conclusion that their DNA lies in the narrow space between architecture and art.Today, any attempt to single out ideal museums and exhibition spaces firstly requires that we shake off our fixations with new builds, architecture at any cost and construction anxiety. Some of the world’s finest museums are spaces that were not originally intended to house art and have been reutilised after restoration and conversion. Many other museums have developed through a long process of stratification, in which architecture and contents have gelled through years of cohabitation. Other exhibition spaces—such as those filled with memories and historical remains often used to house biennials and temporary exhibitions— are literally objets trouvés, places with mixed architecture and functions. However, for this same reason, these are also places of great evocative impact.It is the software as well as the hardware that makes a great museum: the works of art, the exhibitions and the public, and not necessarily the appearance of the buildings. Or rather, what makes a museum unique is the dialogue between its software and its hardware, a dialogue that may flare up in a clash or friction, or settle into perfect harmony. The DNA of museums must be sought in the narrow space that separates the architecture from the artwork—the interval between the architecture and the art is a museum’s true locus. read full article here 


Ideal museums | An Art Report by Massimiliano Gioni

An overview of the most interesting museum models around the world leads to the conclusion that their DNA lies in the narrow space between architecture and art.

Today, any attempt to single out ideal museums and exhibition spaces firstly requires that we shake off our fixations with new builds, architecture at any cost and construction anxiety. Some of the world’s finest museums are spaces that were not originally intended to house art and have been reutilised after restoration and conversion. Many other museums have developed through a long process of stratification, in which architecture and contents have gelled through years of cohabitation. Other exhibition spaces—such as those filled with memories and historical remains often used to house biennials and temporary exhibitions— are literally objets trouvés, places with mixed architecture and functions. However, for this same reason, these are also places of great evocative impact.

It is the software as well as the hardware that makes a great museum: the works of art, the exhibitions and the public, and not necessarily the appearance of the buildings. Or rather, what makes a museum unique is the dialogue between its software and its hardware, a dialogue that may flare up in a clash or friction, or settle into perfect harmony. The DNA of museums must be sought in the narrow space that separates the architecture from the artwork—the interval between the architecture and the art is a museum’s true locus. 

read full article here 

Assemblage by Thaddeus Wolfe“After many trips to the mineral sections of natural history museums, I became intrigued by the forms and the way many of them looked like modernist sculpture. That was the starting point, but my forms don’t actually follow any of the rules by which minerals form. I’ve come up with systems for building the pieces such as stacking, or cutting things apart and reassembling them. I like the idea that the pieces are being built up but also appear to be fractured and coming apart.” ~ Thaddeus Wolfefull article | via Sight Unseen


Assemblage by Thaddeus Wolfe

“After many trips to the mineral sections of natural history museums, I became intrigued by the forms and the way many of them looked like modernist sculpture. That was the starting point, but my forms don’t actually follow any of the rules by which minerals form. I’ve come up with systems for building the pieces such as stacking, or cutting things apart and reassembling them. I like the idea that the pieces are being built up but also appear to be fractured and coming apart.” ~ Thaddeus Wolfe

full article | via Sight Unseen

Yeaha by David ClarkeBritish silversmith David Clarke is known for his unconventional approach to metalwork. He engages with and exposes ‘the rawness of silver’ in pieces that reappropriate the decorative functionality of ordinary objects, to the extent of experimenting with techniques such as the use of salt and lead to chemically burn away at silverware.Clarke juxtaposes the old and the new and playful and refined in a recent series of modified teapots on exhibition by Ornamentum Gallery during miami design week 2011.Retaining the raw quality of certain solders and additions, Clarke splits and recombines silver teapot pieces, at times transforming them into the suggestion of other objects— a woman, wood stove; at times giving them voice with an almost animated spirit; at times experimenting solely with the material aspects of patina, weight, and texture. he combines almost all with lead,juxtaposing the poisonous, unappreciated material with the valued one of silver, challenging the notions of status and intention. 'It's a journey through objects’, Clarke reflects of his design process.All the original teapots are purchased from ebay, where Clarke notes: ‘I only bid on the most unwanted, most unloved; the ones closest to the [garbage] bin. I only buy the one that no one desires. I want to give them a new start in life, a second chance. they come to me; I study them, handle them; I cut them almost surgically, with precision, accuracy, and focus. at this point they are released from their history; they are free to start afresh.’
via designboom


Yeaha by David Clarke


British silversmith D
avid Clarke is known for his unconventional approach to metalwork. 
He engages with and exposes ‘the rawness of silver’ in pieces that reappropriate the decorative 
functionality of ordinary objects, to the extent of experimenting with techniques such as the use 
of salt and lead to chemically burn away at silverware.

Clarke juxtaposes the old and the new and playful and refined in a recent series of modified teapots 
on exhibition by Ornamentum Gallery during miami design week 2011.

Retaining the raw quality of certain solders and additions, Clarke splits and recombines silver teapot pieces, 
at times transforming them into the suggestion of other objects— a woman, wood stove; 
at times giving them voice with an almost animated spirit; at times experimenting solely with 
the material aspects of patina, weight, and texture. he combines almost all with lead,
juxtaposing the poisonous, unappreciated material with the valued one of silver, challenging the notions 
of status and intention. 'It's a journey through objects’, Clarke reflects of his design process.

All the original teapots are purchased from ebay, where Clarke notes: ‘I only bid on the most unwanted, 
most unloved; the ones closest to the [garbage] bin. I only buy the one that no one desires. 
I want to give them a new start in life, a second chance. they come to me; I study them, handle them; 
I cut them almost surgically, with precision, accuracy, and focus. at this point they are released from 
their history; they are free to start afresh
.’

via designboom

How The World Slowly Started To Turn Pink by Desiree Hammen
‘It all started with a single sequin from my sewing-package of the second module that I took, novemer 2010 at L’école Lesage in Paris’. ~ Desiree Hammen

The methamorphosis started on a small skill but it still spreads into the world. The work has been shown at De Krabbedans in Eindhoven and at Salon in Amsterdam where it was exhibited in an extended version.
About the artist 
Desirée Hammen (1976) graduated at Artez Institute of the Arts in Arnhem, 2003. She works as a fashion designer and artist in her hometown Eindhoven,The Netherlands. Desirée’s current work consists of a series of free-knit cardigans, installations and autonomous embroideries, her speciality. She has finished her training at the famous Ecole Lesage in Paris, where she lives part-time.In her work Desirée is combining haute couture techniques with her own DIY skills, exploring the beauty of imperfection. Her work is being described as ‘poetic, chaotic, intense and playful’. With her indoor and outdoor installations she is disrupting reality in a gentle way. With her handmade one-of-a-kind clothings she is stressing the personality of the person who is wearing it. Over the last years Desirée participated in exhibitions and projects in Amsterdam, New York and Shanghai.


How The World Slowly Started To Turn Pink by Desiree Hammen


‘It all started with a single sequin from my sewing-package of the second module that I took, novemer 2010 at L’école Lesage in Paris’. ~ Desiree Hammen

The methamorphosis started on a small skill but it still spreads into the world. The work has been shown at De Krabbedans in Eindhoven and at Salon in Amsterdam where it was exhibited in an extended version.

About the artist

Desirée Hammen (1976) graduated at Artez Institute of the Arts in Arnhem, 2003. She works as a fashion designer and artist in her hometown Eindhoven,The Netherlands. Desirée’s current work consists of a series of free-knit cardigans, installations and autonomous embroideries, her speciality. She has finished her training at the famous Ecole Lesage in Paris, where she lives part-time.In her work Desirée is combining haute couture techniques with her own DIY skills, exploring the beauty of imperfection. Her work is being described as ‘poetic, chaotic, intense and playful’. With her indoor and outdoor installations she is disrupting reality in a gentle way. With her handmade one-of-a-kind clothings she is stressing the personality of the person who is wearing it. Over the last years Desirée participated in exhibitions and projects in Amsterdam, New York and Shanghai.

addictedtoconsumerism:

andreirobu: Designersgotoheaven.com - Porcelain skull: “Predictive dream XX” by Katsuyo Aoki

addictedtoconsumerism:

andreirobu: Designersgotoheaven.com - Porcelain skull: “Predictive dream XX” by Katsuyo Aoki

Tomorrow is Another Day by Mathieu Lehanneur" Mathieu Lehanneur’s Demain est un Autre Jour (Tomorrow is Another Day), provides food for thought regarding the permanence and impermanence of things, about the principles of uncertainty, ineluctability and spirituality, allowing everyone to be a day ahead of time itself… Originally intended for the Palliative Care Unit of the Diaconesses / Croix-Saint-Simon Hospital Group, this device eludes the course of time by offering everyone the opportunity to see tomorrow’s sky. Conceived from weather information gathered in real time on the Internet, the luminous - atmospheric and impressionist – image of this sky is diffused through the network of a honeycomb structure, appearing both like a sculpture and a celestial globe.”Photos: Felipe RibonWords: Mathieu Lehanneur

Tomorrow is Another Day by Mathieu Lehanneur

" Mathieu Lehanneur’s Demain est un Autre Jour (Tomorrow is Another Day), provides food for thought regarding the permanence and impermanence of things, about the principles of uncertainty, ineluctability and spirituality, allowing everyone to be a day ahead of time itself… Originally intended for the Palliative Care Unit of the Diaconesses / Croix-Saint-Simon Hospital Group, this device eludes the course of time by offering everyone the opportunity to see tomorrow’s sky. Conceived from weather information gathered in real time on the Internet, the luminous - atmospheric and impressionist – image of this sky is diffused through the network of a honeycomb structure, appearing both like a sculpture and a celestial globe.”

Photos: Felipe Ribon
Words: Mathieu Lehanneur

A pivot is built in the centre of the gallery and wet plaster is poured on floor. When the plaster is about to cure, a large wooden running mould with a sharp zinc profile is pushed through the paste-like material. This is repeated many times, building up layer after layer, to leave a perfect plaster scraping behind. After drying out completely, a hard plaster bench remains.

Running Mould belongs to a series of Glithero’s work where the dichotomy of product and process strive to be one and the same. The twelve metre long bench took three and a half tonnes of plaster and a team of nine working continuously with the material on location in the gallery space.

The running mould process is an interpretation of the artisanal technique of making plaster cornices found in classical architecture, by running a zinc profile through wet plaster. Typically, the running mould or bench mould is made and left on the bench surface of the craftsman and serves as a mould to make a number of casts from. By translating this process in scale and spectacle it has the power to trigger an intrinsic understanding of object, its process, and origin and material.

 

About Glithero

Glithero are British designer Tim Simpson and Dutch designer Sarah van Gameren, who met and studied at the Royal College of Art. From their studio in London they create product, furniture, and time-based installations that give birth to unique and wonderful products. The work is presented in a broad spectrum of media, but follows a consistent conceptual path; to capture and present the beauty in the moment things are made.

From machines that miraculously create wax chandeliers from strung wick, a pouring slide that becomes a 10 metre long poly-concrete table, to ceramics that turn vivid blue with UV light, the key ingredients of their work are time and transformation. With their own concoction of creation-performance they aim to bridge creative disciplines and make works that can be understood by all.

In the past year Glithero has presented solo shows in London, Paris and Rotterdam, as well as exhibitions in Milan, Berlin and Basel. and in 2011 the studio has been shortlisted for the Brit Insurance Award and the Dutch Design Awards.

COSMIC WONDER Light Source
COSMIC WONDER Light Source, launched in 2007, is a fashion project.COSMIC WONDER study various aspects of light and weave these ideas into the clothing.Wearing light, one creates an environmental effect, shifting the balance of everyday occurrences. Sharing the light’s warmth, the brightness of life opens up to the universe.
The Origins of LightWhat produces light, what describes a path through space.Wearing the light, sharing its warmth.It passes through us.Create a space in COSMIC WONDER Light Source.Bring the space with you everyday.
(from COSMIC WONDER FREE PRESS 1)
Organization Cosmic Wonder / Center for COSMIC WONDER
Cosmic Wonder is a conceptual project initiated in 1997 by artist Yukinori Maeda. It is composed of three distinct activities; COSMIC WONDER (artworks),COSMIC WONDER Light Source (fashion and lifestyle project) and COSMIC WONDER Free Press (book and music publishing).
The Center for COSMIC WONDER, founded in 2007, was designed to integrate all of these various activities. Besides functioning as a gallery space for art and concerts, it is a shelter from the daily march of time, where visitors can share the experience of drifting along with the flow of sounds in the universe.

COSMIC WONDER Light Source

COSMIC WONDER Light Source, launched in 2007, is a fashion project.
COSMIC WONDER study various aspects of light and weave these ideas into the clothing.
Wearing light, one creates an environmental effect, shifting the balance of everyday occurrences
Sharing the light’s warmth, the brightness of life opens up to the universe.

The Origins of Light
What produces light, what describes a path through space.
Wearing the light, sharing its warmth.
It passes through us.
Create a space in COSMIC WONDER Light Source.
Bring the space with you everyday.

(from COSMIC WONDER FREE PRESS 1)

Organization Cosmic Wonder / Center for COSMIC WONDER

Cosmic Wonder is a conceptual project initiated in 1997 by artist Yukinori Maeda. 
It is composed of three distinct activities; COSMIC WONDER (artworks),
COSMIC WONDER Light Source (fashion and lifestyle project) 
and COSMIC WONDER Free Press (book and music publishing).

The Center for COSMIC WONDER, founded in 2007, was designed to integrate all of these various activities. Besides functioning as a gallery space for art and concerts, it is a shelter from the daily march of time, where visitors can share the experience of drifting along with the flow of sounds in the universe.