A Piece of Flat Globe Vol.6 (detail)
2008Cut on Yupo (Synthetic Paper), glue5 1/8(H) x 6 11/16(W) x 5 15/16(D) inches13(H) x 17(W) x 15(D) cm
NORIKO AMBE : LINEAR-ACTIONS CUTTING PROJECT

Started in ‘99, this is Noriko’s work. She individually cut single sheets of paper by free-hand and stack them together. The work consists of positive or negative shapes. Noriko is trying to embody relationships among humans, time and nature.

A Piece of Flat Globe Vol.6 (detail)

2008
Cut on Yupo (Synthetic Paper), glue
5 1/8(H) x 6 11/16(W) x 5 15/16(D) inches
13(H) x 17(W) x 15(D) cm

NORIKO AMBE : LINEAR-ACTIONS CUTTING PROJECT

Started in ‘99, this is Noriko’s work. She individually cut single sheets of paper by free-hand and stack them together. The work consists of positive or negative shapes. Noriko is trying to embody relationships among humans, time and nature.

Slab, 2011wool, ash, acid dye, watercolor, 177.8 x 228.6 cmcourtesy of the artist
ANNA BETBEZE create exquisitely grotesque acid-dyed woolen flokati carpets. Dyed, burned, pulled, cut and washed, her rugs are the proof of her spirit of wild material experimentation: she explained that her process is the simultaneity of making and unmaking, at once the original object is destroyed and a new one emerges.
In fact, she came to her signature material more or less by chance while she was at Yale: I lived with one of the rugs, and it became a filthy mess and I started really enjoying it and thought to try painting on it. Crawling around on them, being enveloped by them in the making” is to be immersed in them entirely. A lot of times the process is out my control.
ANNA BETBEZE was born in Mobile, Alabama. She received her BFA from the University of Georgia in 2003 and her MFA from Yale University in 2006, She lives and works in New York City and teaches at Yale School of Art. In the summer of 2010, BETBEZE participated in group exhibitions at Ramiken Crucible, New York, NY, and Horton Gallery, Berlin, Germany. She has also shown at Rachel Uffner Gallery, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Swing Space, and PPOW Gallery in New York.
via we find wildness

Slab, 2011
wool, ash, acid dye, watercolor, 177.8 x 228.6 cm
courtesy of the artist

ANNA BETBEZE create exquisitely grotesque acid-dyed woolen flokati carpets. Dyed, burned, pulled, cut and washed, her rugs are the proof of her spirit of wild material experimentation: she explained that her process is the simultaneity of making and unmaking, at once the original object is destroyed and a new one emerges.

In fact, she came to her signature material more or less by chance while she was at Yale: I lived with one of the rugs, and it became a filthy mess and I started really enjoying it and thought to try painting on it. Crawling around on them, being enveloped by them in the making” is to be immersed in them entirely. A lot of times the process is out my control.

ANNA BETBEZE was born in Mobile, Alabama. She received her BFA from the University of Georgia in 2003 and her MFA from Yale University in 2006, She lives and works in New York City and teaches at Yale School of Art. In the summer of 2010, BETBEZE participated in group exhibitions at Ramiken Crucible, New York, NY, and Horton Gallery, Berlin, Germany. She has also shown at Rachel Uffner Gallery, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Swing Space, and PPOW Gallery in New York.

via we find wildness

Katja Schenker - Nougat

Katja Schenker realized the work Nougat during a studio fellowship in the Sitterwerk two years ago. A rectangular hole in the earth was excavated and then filled with concrete along with: firesand, lime, kaolin, bitumen, colophony, brass, copper, bronze, graphite, wood, marble, granite, river stones, plaster, slate, hard coal, charcoal, asphalt, brick sand, silicon, aluminum, bamboo, hay, pine cones, straw, cork, mussels, pigments, lamp black, coconut, chalk, clay, pumice stone, tuff, lava rock, gneiss, quartz and plant seeds. The artist estimated a weight of around five tons, to afterwards be lifted from the pit and cut into a precise four-sided cube with a diamond saw.
via we find wildness

Katja Schenker - Nougat


Katja Schenker realized the work Nougat during a studio fellowship in the Sitterwerk two years ago. A rectangular hole in the earth was excavated and then filled with concrete along with: firesand, lime, kaolin, bitumen, colophony, brass, copper, bronze, graphite, wood, marble, granite, river stones, plaster, slate, hard coal, charcoal, asphalt, brick sand, silicon, aluminum, bamboo, hay, pine cones, straw, cork, mussels, pigments, lamp black, coconut, chalk, clay, pumice stone, tuff, lava rock, gneiss, quartz and plant seeds. The artist estimated a weight of around five tons, to afterwards be lifted from the pit and cut into a precise four-sided cube with a diamond saw.

via we find wildness

An Image Of Dementia by  Jetske Visser
What is a teapot when you no longer know what a teapot is? How does a person suffering from dementia experience his or her surroundings? In Jetske Visser’s film Forgotten Memory the viewer is submerged in the world of dementia. By doing research and examining literature on the subject, and by spending time with elderly people suffering from the condition, Visser has created an image of their hazy, fragile and precarious existence. As a metaphor for the condition she has transformed a series of everyday objects and taken pictures of people with dementia. The film demonstrates that things are not always what you would expect.

An Image Of Dementia by  Jetske Visser

What is a teapot when you no longer know what a teapot is? How does a person suffering from dementia experience his or her surroundings? In Jetske Visser’s film Forgotten Memory the viewer is submerged in the world of dementia. By doing research and examining literature on the subject, and by spending time with elderly people suffering from the condition, Visser has created an image of their hazy, fragile and precarious existence. As a metaphor for the condition she has transformed a series of everyday objects and taken pictures of people with dementia. The film demonstrates that things are not always what you would expect.

Drunken Clarity, 2011. broken beer bottles, putty, 24 carat gold, gum arabic
Claire Healy & Sean Cordeiro

Drunken Clarity, 2011. broken beer bottles, putty, 24 carat gold, gum arabic

Claire Healy & Sean Cordeiro

A short film directed by Studio Jo Meesters. Synopsis: Die Ordnung is about the process of PULP in the making which is shown at the In Residence’s exhibition called Ten Small Atlases during the Salone Del Mobile 2010.

In collaboration with Lisa Klappe and Niek Pulles.

Sheila Hicks. American, La Clef, 1988 (rubber bands, metal key)
“Textiles had been relegated to a secondary role in our society, to a material that was either functional or decorative.  I wanted to give it another status and show what an artist can do with these incredible materials.”

Sheila Hicks. American, La Clef, 1988 (rubber bands, metal key)

“Textiles had been relegated to a secondary role in our society, to a material that was either functional or decorative.  I wanted to give it another status and show what an artist can do with these incredible materials.”

Sheila Hicks - Zapallar, 1957-58 (wool)
“Textiles had been relegated to a secondary role in our society, to a material that was either functional or decorative.  I wanted to give it another status and show what an artist can do with these incredible materials.” 

Sheila Hicks - Zapallar, 1957-58 (wool)

“Textiles had been relegated to a secondary role in our society, to a material that was either functional or decorative.  I wanted to give it another status and show what an artist can do with these incredible materials.” 

Protocol Of Desire - Freudenthal | Verhagen (2006)

Protocol Of Desire - Freudenthal | Verhagen (2006)

Explosion - Kochiro Doi (2008)

Explosion - Kochiro Doi (2008)

Sometimes I Think Sometimes I Don’t - Stefan Brüggemann (2001)

Sometimes I Think Sometimes I Don’t - Stefan Brüggemann (2001)