The Making of a Blueware Vase by Glithero

London based designers Glithero are masters at documenting their creation process. Although I have seen their Blueware Vases before I hadn’t seen this beautiful ‘making of’ film. The process used is called cyanotypes, where direct impressions of botanical specimens are captured on earthenware, using photosensitive chemicals. 

The vases are coated with photosensitive dye before pressed plants are applied to the surface. The vases are then exposed to ultraviolet light, causing the dye to react. The exposed areas of the vase turn an intense Prussian blue, while the parts protected by the plants remain white, creating a crisp silhouette of the plant.

via Lin-Morris 

Valérie Buess: Paper SculpturesValérie Buess is a swiss artist who lives in Germany. For the last twenty years she has worked primarily with paper creating intricate sculptures that often resemble urchins, coral and other underwater life.Check her website for more work. 


Valérie Buess: Paper Sculptures

Valérie Buess is a swiss artist who lives in Germany. For the last twenty years she has worked primarily with paper creating intricate sculptures that often resemble urchins, coral and other underwater life.

Check her website for more work. 

Paper Sculptures by Lauren ClayBehold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website.   
via LinMorris


Paper Sculptures by Lauren Clay

Behold the beautiful work of Lauren Clay, a New York based artist who works with brightly coloured card and paper to make these magical sculptures. She describes the works as 3D realisations of her large scale drawings, which are also incredible and can be seen on her website. 

image 

image 

via LinMorris

Ryan Hope: Permanent Ink on Nowness.com.


Ryan Hope: Permanent Ink

A New Film for Dasha Zhukova Reveals the Passion Driving the Tattoo Scene

Internationally renowned tattooist Mo Coppoletta divulges the personal significances of being inked in this intricate profile by filmmaker Ryan Hope. Owner of influential London parlor A Family Business, Coppoletta has turned his dedication into a lifestyle, making international pilgrimages to be tattooed by those at the pinnacle of the craft.

Today’s short is an exclusive extract from Hope’s documentary Skin, which follows five skin-art collectors on their journey to be tattooed with designs created by major contemporary artists Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Raymond Pettibon, Jake and Dinos Chapman, and Richard Prince.  

via nowness 

Assemblage by Thaddeus Wolfe“After many trips to the mineral sections of natural history museums, I became intrigued by the forms and the way many of them looked like modernist sculpture. That was the starting point, but my forms don’t actually follow any of the rules by which minerals form. I’ve come up with systems for building the pieces such as stacking, or cutting things apart and reassembling them. I like the idea that the pieces are being built up but also appear to be fractured and coming apart.” ~ Thaddeus Wolfefull article | via Sight Unseen


Assemblage by Thaddeus Wolfe

“After many trips to the mineral sections of natural history museums, I became intrigued by the forms and the way many of them looked like modernist sculpture. That was the starting point, but my forms don’t actually follow any of the rules by which minerals form. I’ve come up with systems for building the pieces such as stacking, or cutting things apart and reassembling them. I like the idea that the pieces are being built up but also appear to be fractured and coming apart.” ~ Thaddeus Wolfe

full article | via Sight Unseen

Yeaha by David ClarkeBritish silversmith David Clarke is known for his unconventional approach to metalwork. He engages with and exposes ‘the rawness of silver’ in pieces that reappropriate the decorative functionality of ordinary objects, to the extent of experimenting with techniques such as the use of salt and lead to chemically burn away at silverware.Clarke juxtaposes the old and the new and playful and refined in a recent series of modified teapots on exhibition by Ornamentum Gallery during miami design week 2011.Retaining the raw quality of certain solders and additions, Clarke splits and recombines silver teapot pieces, at times transforming them into the suggestion of other objects— a woman, wood stove; at times giving them voice with an almost animated spirit; at times experimenting solely with the material aspects of patina, weight, and texture. he combines almost all with lead,juxtaposing the poisonous, unappreciated material with the valued one of silver, challenging the notions of status and intention. 'It's a journey through objects’, Clarke reflects of his design process.All the original teapots are purchased from ebay, where Clarke notes: ‘I only bid on the most unwanted, most unloved; the ones closest to the [garbage] bin. I only buy the one that no one desires. I want to give them a new start in life, a second chance. they come to me; I study them, handle them; I cut them almost surgically, with precision, accuracy, and focus. at this point they are released from their history; they are free to start afresh.’
via designboom


Yeaha by David Clarke


British silversmith D
avid Clarke is known for his unconventional approach to metalwork. 
He engages with and exposes ‘the rawness of silver’ in pieces that reappropriate the decorative 
functionality of ordinary objects, to the extent of experimenting with techniques such as the use 
of salt and lead to chemically burn away at silverware.

Clarke juxtaposes the old and the new and playful and refined in a recent series of modified teapots 
on exhibition by Ornamentum Gallery during miami design week 2011.

Retaining the raw quality of certain solders and additions, Clarke splits and recombines silver teapot pieces, 
at times transforming them into the suggestion of other objects— a woman, wood stove; 
at times giving them voice with an almost animated spirit; at times experimenting solely with 
the material aspects of patina, weight, and texture. he combines almost all with lead,
juxtaposing the poisonous, unappreciated material with the valued one of silver, challenging the notions 
of status and intention. 'It's a journey through objects’, Clarke reflects of his design process.

All the original teapots are purchased from ebay, where Clarke notes: ‘I only bid on the most unwanted, 
most unloved; the ones closest to the [garbage] bin. I only buy the one that no one desires. 
I want to give them a new start in life, a second chance. they come to me; I study them, handle them; 
I cut them almost surgically, with precision, accuracy, and focus. at this point they are released from 
their history; they are free to start afresh
.’

via designboom

How The World Slowly Started To Turn Pink by Desiree Hammen
‘It all started with a single sequin from my sewing-package of the second module that I took, novemer 2010 at L’école Lesage in Paris’. ~ Desiree Hammen

The methamorphosis started on a small skill but it still spreads into the world. The work has been shown at De Krabbedans in Eindhoven and at Salon in Amsterdam where it was exhibited in an extended version.
About the artist 
Desirée Hammen (1976) graduated at Artez Institute of the Arts in Arnhem, 2003. She works as a fashion designer and artist in her hometown Eindhoven,The Netherlands. Desirée’s current work consists of a series of free-knit cardigans, installations and autonomous embroideries, her speciality. She has finished her training at the famous Ecole Lesage in Paris, where she lives part-time.In her work Desirée is combining haute couture techniques with her own DIY skills, exploring the beauty of imperfection. Her work is being described as ‘poetic, chaotic, intense and playful’. With her indoor and outdoor installations she is disrupting reality in a gentle way. With her handmade one-of-a-kind clothings she is stressing the personality of the person who is wearing it. Over the last years Desirée participated in exhibitions and projects in Amsterdam, New York and Shanghai.


How The World Slowly Started To Turn Pink by Desiree Hammen


‘It all started with a single sequin from my sewing-package of the second module that I took, novemer 2010 at L’école Lesage in Paris’. ~ Desiree Hammen

The methamorphosis started on a small skill but it still spreads into the world. The work has been shown at De Krabbedans in Eindhoven and at Salon in Amsterdam where it was exhibited in an extended version.

About the artist

Desirée Hammen (1976) graduated at Artez Institute of the Arts in Arnhem, 2003. She works as a fashion designer and artist in her hometown Eindhoven,The Netherlands. Desirée’s current work consists of a series of free-knit cardigans, installations and autonomous embroideries, her speciality. She has finished her training at the famous Ecole Lesage in Paris, where she lives part-time.In her work Desirée is combining haute couture techniques with her own DIY skills, exploring the beauty of imperfection. Her work is being described as ‘poetic, chaotic, intense and playful’. With her indoor and outdoor installations she is disrupting reality in a gentle way. With her handmade one-of-a-kind clothings she is stressing the personality of the person who is wearing it. Over the last years Desirée participated in exhibitions and projects in Amsterdam, New York and Shanghai.

addictedtoconsumerism:

andreirobu: Designersgotoheaven.com - Porcelain skull: “Predictive dream XX” by Katsuyo Aoki

addictedtoconsumerism:

andreirobu: Designersgotoheaven.com - Porcelain skull: “Predictive dream XX” by Katsuyo Aoki

A Symposium On Shaping The Future Of Industry

Me Craft/You Industry

The English‐language symposium will examine past and present industrial and craft design processes and look towards tomorrow’s work landscape – a key concept for the exhibition’s curators, Rianne Makkink and Jurgen Bey of Studio Makkink & Bey. They argue that we can use industry to enhance the design of the industrial landscape and foster small‐scale, local entrepreneurship and innovation. “I imagine an industrial landscape with an attractiveness equalling that of a forest,” says Bey. “Craft was always about getting a grip on technology, and it still is today. Dedication and poetry will shape the landscapes where we’ll live and work.”

Programme and speakers

What do craft and industry have to offer each other in the 21st century? Which past ideas and modes of working and living can help us to figure this out? And what potential do new scientific and technological innovations hold for design? These are among the questions to be addressed at the symposium, planned by the designer and researcher Sophie Krier. Along with Dadi, Oosterling and Raby, speakers will include the Wageningen University researcher and materials programme coordinator Christiaan Bolck; the Icelandic software developer, writer and hacker Smári McCarthy; and the designer and Sandberg Institute director Jurgen Bey. Also participating in the discussion will be the designers Sonja Bäumel, Dries Verbruggen of Unfold, and Sarah van Gameren of Glithero, will take part in a series of discussion rounds.

more info : www.premsela.org

A pivot is built in the centre of the gallery and wet plaster is poured on floor. When the plaster is about to cure, a large wooden running mould with a sharp zinc profile is pushed through the paste-like material. This is repeated many times, building up layer after layer, to leave a perfect plaster scraping behind. After drying out completely, a hard plaster bench remains.

Running Mould belongs to a series of Glithero’s work where the dichotomy of product and process strive to be one and the same. The twelve metre long bench took three and a half tonnes of plaster and a team of nine working continuously with the material on location in the gallery space.

The running mould process is an interpretation of the artisanal technique of making plaster cornices found in classical architecture, by running a zinc profile through wet plaster. Typically, the running mould or bench mould is made and left on the bench surface of the craftsman and serves as a mould to make a number of casts from. By translating this process in scale and spectacle it has the power to trigger an intrinsic understanding of object, its process, and origin and material.

 

About Glithero

Glithero are British designer Tim Simpson and Dutch designer Sarah van Gameren, who met and studied at the Royal College of Art. From their studio in London they create product, furniture, and time-based installations that give birth to unique and wonderful products. The work is presented in a broad spectrum of media, but follows a consistent conceptual path; to capture and present the beauty in the moment things are made.

From machines that miraculously create wax chandeliers from strung wick, a pouring slide that becomes a 10 metre long poly-concrete table, to ceramics that turn vivid blue with UV light, the key ingredients of their work are time and transformation. With their own concoction of creation-performance they aim to bridge creative disciplines and make works that can be understood by all.

In the past year Glithero has presented solo shows in London, Paris and Rotterdam, as well as exhibitions in Milan, Berlin and Basel. and in 2011 the studio has been shortlisted for the Brit Insurance Award and the Dutch Design Awards.

LightStone Project by Ori Yekutiel
LightStone Project is the graduation project of Ori Yekutiel in the department of Industrial Design at the Bezalel Academy and was made in collaboration with the department of Ceramic & Glass in 2010.
LightStone is a new foamed basalt-like material, which he developed as part of his graduation project. It has many unique attributes, amongst them is light weight, constructiveness, acoustic isolation and high thermal resistance. Moreover, it can be integrated with ceramic bodies with which it comes into contact while being fired in the kiln.
This research project stemmed from Ori’s desire to examine the potential of basalt as a raw material, and as starting point for design. At first his research focused on attempts to melt the basalt stone, returning it to its liquid form. Having succeeded in reaching this primordial state of matter, he experimented with interventions aimed at creating new compounds which would become the base material for his design work.
The stool is an example of a work using the mixed techniques he developed. Its surfaces preserve the memory of the pressure of expanding in the mould in which it was created. This echoes the way the basalt itself preserves the memory of the lava’s movement at the time of its formation.
more on this project can be found here


LightStone Project by Ori Yekutiel

LightStone Project is the graduation project of Ori Yekutiel in the department of Industrial Design at the Bezalel Academy and was made in collaboration with the department of Ceramic & Glass in 2010.

LightStone is a new foamed basalt-like material, which he developed as part of his graduation project. It has many unique attributes, amongst them is light weight, constructiveness, acoustic isolation and high thermal resistance. Moreover, it can be integrated with ceramic bodies with which it comes into contact while being fired in the kiln.

This research project stemmed from Ori’s desire to examine the potential of basalt as a raw material, and as starting point for design. At first his research focused on attempts to melt the basalt stone, returning it to its liquid form. Having succeeded in reaching this primordial state of matter, he experimented with interventions aimed at creating new compounds which would become the base material for his design work.

The stool is an example of a work using the mixed techniques he developed. Its surfaces preserve the memory of the pressure of expanding in the mould in which it was created. This echoes the way the basalt itself preserves the memory of the lava’s movement at the time of its formation.

more on this project can be found here

COSMIC WONDER Light Source
COSMIC WONDER Light Source, launched in 2007, is a fashion project.COSMIC WONDER study various aspects of light and weave these ideas into the clothing.Wearing light, one creates an environmental effect, shifting the balance of everyday occurrences. Sharing the light’s warmth, the brightness of life opens up to the universe.
The Origins of LightWhat produces light, what describes a path through space.Wearing the light, sharing its warmth.It passes through us.Create a space in COSMIC WONDER Light Source.Bring the space with you everyday.
(from COSMIC WONDER FREE PRESS 1)
Organization Cosmic Wonder / Center for COSMIC WONDER
Cosmic Wonder is a conceptual project initiated in 1997 by artist Yukinori Maeda. It is composed of three distinct activities; COSMIC WONDER (artworks),COSMIC WONDER Light Source (fashion and lifestyle project) and COSMIC WONDER Free Press (book and music publishing).
The Center for COSMIC WONDER, founded in 2007, was designed to integrate all of these various activities. Besides functioning as a gallery space for art and concerts, it is a shelter from the daily march of time, where visitors can share the experience of drifting along with the flow of sounds in the universe.

COSMIC WONDER Light Source

COSMIC WONDER Light Source, launched in 2007, is a fashion project.
COSMIC WONDER study various aspects of light and weave these ideas into the clothing.
Wearing light, one creates an environmental effect, shifting the balance of everyday occurrences
Sharing the light’s warmth, the brightness of life opens up to the universe.

The Origins of Light
What produces light, what describes a path through space.
Wearing the light, sharing its warmth.
It passes through us.
Create a space in COSMIC WONDER Light Source.
Bring the space with you everyday.

(from COSMIC WONDER FREE PRESS 1)

Organization Cosmic Wonder / Center for COSMIC WONDER

Cosmic Wonder is a conceptual project initiated in 1997 by artist Yukinori Maeda. 
It is composed of three distinct activities; COSMIC WONDER (artworks),
COSMIC WONDER Light Source (fashion and lifestyle project) 
and COSMIC WONDER Free Press (book and music publishing).

The Center for COSMIC WONDER, founded in 2007, was designed to integrate all of these various activities. Besides functioning as a gallery space for art and concerts, it is a shelter from the daily march of time, where visitors can share the experience of drifting along with the flow of sounds in the universe.


Illustrations for Flow Festival 2011 by Santtu Mustonen
From Finland, Santtu Mustonen brings together illustration and animation in a wonderfully bizarre manner. He’s also got some really clever animated GIFs and some beautiful 3D type that looks like brush strokes floating. It’s just amazing that he’s bridging this idea between handmade and digital, recreating the subtleties of craft and trying to make them seem as real as possible.  



Illustrations for Flow Festival 2011 by Santtu Mustonen

From Finland, Santtu Mustonen brings together illustration and animation in a wonderfully bizarre manner. He’s also got some really clever animated GIFs and some beautiful 3D type that looks like brush strokes floating. It’s just amazing that he’s bridging this idea between handmade and digital, recreating the subtleties of craft and trying to make them seem as real as possible.  

DURAMEN SERIES - Handmade Wooden Sculptures by Bonsoir Paris

DURAMEN is a series of handmade wooden sculptures. Born of a simple impulse, the one to break with conventional ways of exhibiting, BONSOIR PARIS and its team have imagined a series of frames so strongly mistreated that they have become unrecognizable. Their wish is to break the properties of the compound, a form of compromise as minimal and it is efficient. They found a subtle twist while remaining faithful to a primitive form of revolt, without getting lost in vain styles effects. The choice of noble materials (Oak, Fir, Wenge, Pear, Linden) and the quest for finesse, enables them - with the DURAMEN series - to position themselves on the razor’s edge between two opposites, that of the deformed and that of the elegant, instinctive and thoughtful.via Behance 

DURAMEN SERIESHandmade Wooden Sculptures by Bonsoir Paris

DURAMEN is a series of handmade wooden sculptures. Born of a simple impulse, the one to break with conventional ways of exhibiting, BONSOIR PARIS and its team have imagined a series of frames so strongly mistreated that they have become unrecognizable. Their wish is to break the properties of the compound, a form of compromise as minimal and it is efficient. They found a subtle twist while remaining faithful to a primitive form of revolt, without getting lost in vain styles effects. The choice of noble materials (Oak, Fir, Wenge, Pear, Linden) and the quest for finesse, enables them - with the DURAMEN series - to position themselves on the razor’s edge between two opposites, that of the deformed and that of the elegant, instinctive and thoughtful.

via Behance 

Feed Me Spoons by David Clarke
David Clarke takes zinc, pewter and lead to old Sheffield plate spoons, creating unusual modern hybrid cutlery and artistic utensils.

Feed Me Spoons by David Clarke

David Clarke takes zinc, pewter and lead to old Sheffield plate spoons, creating unusual modern hybrid cutlery and artistic utensils.