prostheticknowledge:

Inside Insides

Magnetic resonance imaging of foods

Creative blog uses MRI scanner to look into objects such as vegetables, often with pleasurable results. These captures into animated gifs (as you can see above).

You can check out more at the blog here

[Note - I am not responsible for the above Gifs - they were made by Andy Ellison who runs the blog - the only alteration I have made of them is to optimize and reduce the original file sizes so they can run here. Higher resolution versions can be found at the blog itself]

VOGUE ITALIA // FACE THE FUTURE // GORDON VON STEINER // STEVEN MEISEL from Gordon von Steiner on Vimeo.

freundevonfreunden:

Face the future

A film by Gordon Von Steiner for Vogue Italia

Gordon von Steiner is one of the new upcoming talents in photography and filmmaking. The New York-based fashionista envisions and portrays his ideas in original ways, while high caliber clients become more and more aware of him.

Vogue Italia is one of those clients and asked Steiner to direct a film for their September cover story 2012, shot by Steven Meisel: Face the Future. Featuring the mesmerizing Carolyn Murphy, among with strange absurdities of actual people and dolls, not just a fashion video is presented but as well a film that carries along an important concern of the image’s future.

""Because I know that time is always time, and place is always and only place, and what is actual is actual only for one time, and only for one place" ~ T.S. Elliot"

Egelsee by Thomas Albdorf

"Egelsee" is a body of work that Albdorf developed during "Part - 1", the first part of Vienna-based Men In Space's ongoing collaborative series “Part” that brings together various artists working with different media. All shown photographs and installations were created during 2 days in a previously defined area by Thomas Albdorf, Clemens Haas and Lukas Ipsmiller.

Source : Thomas Albdorf

Image originally posted by :  : R - Mag


Elspeth Diederix - Maquette (2008)Elspeth Diederix (born Nairobi, Kenya, 1971) is an artist who is always on the move. Travelling for her is a way of life. Even though most of her photographs are taken in exotic locations, evidence of this is seldom found in her work. Purposefully she herself remains on the outside. Instead of being absorbed by the setting of her subject, she prefers to maintain a high degree of detachment. This enables her to create a sense of alienation and in her photographs she achieves this by stripping everyday objects of what normally one takes for granted. There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images.website 


Elspeth Diederix - Maquette (2008)

Elspeth Diederix (born Nairobi, Kenya, 1971) is an artist who is always on the move. Travelling for her is a way of life. Even though most of her photographs are taken in exotic locations, evidence of this is seldom found in her work. Purposefully she herself remains on the outside. Instead of being absorbed by the setting of her subject, she prefers to maintain a high degree of detachment. This enables her to create a sense of alienation and in her photographs she achieves this by stripping everyday objects of what normally one takes for granted. There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images.

website

 

Amethyst by Koen HauserAmethyst is a site-specific installation with images and sound. Slowly dissolving slides reminisce the process of decay. The automated slideshow is projected in a dimly lit but richly decorated room, the visual style of the imagery referring to fashion photography.Koen Hauser created this work on the occasion of Salon/1, by whom he was invited to show his work in Museum van Loon during the Amsterdam Fashion Week 2010.website Koen Hauservia RMag 


Amethyst by Koen Hauser


Amethyst is a site-specific installation with images and sound. Slowly dissolving slides reminisce the process of decay. The automated slideshow is projected in a dimly lit but richly decorated room, the visual style of the imagery referring to fashion photography.



Koen Hauser created this work on the occasion of Salon/1, by whom he was invited to show his work in Museum van Loon during the Amsterdam Fashion Week 2010.




website Koen Hauser

via RMag 

Foam | What’s Next? - A Search Into The Future Of Photography

Join the discussion on foam.org/whatsnext#

themissive:

Plastic 40 by Heidi Leverty

"It is common to associate recycling with words like garbage, junk, maybe even mess and chaos, but behind the discarded items beautiful textures, shapes and colors can be found. Photographer Heidi Leverty has used discarded objects as her primary focus of study from behind the lens for the past eight years, bringing out beauty in what would be considered the end-of-the-line items that have been tossed away. " ~  vertical-review.com

themissive:

Plastic 40 by Heidi Leverty


"It is common to associate recycling with words like garbage, junk, maybe even mess and chaos, but behind the discarded items beautiful textures, shapes and colors can be found. Photographer Heidi Leverty has used discarded objects as her primary focus of study from behind the lens for the past eight years, bringing out beauty in what would be considered the end-of-the-line items that have been tossed away. " ~  vertical-review.com

Vegetable Bowl by Kyoko HamadaKyoko Hamada (b 1973) was born in Tokyo and moved to the United States at the age of 15.	She studied art history and fine art in New York, and Brooklyn where she has lived since 2001. For the past six years she has combined big-budget advertising campaigns for the likes of Microsoft with prize-winning editorial work for the New York Times, Washington Post, Fortune and Entertainment Weekly.
Very quiet, very composed and yet with many instances of incidental loveliness – the portfolio of Kyoko Hamada is filled with a great amount of alternating photographic series. From conceptual continuity (see pineapple under the bed and apples and bananas to random acts of beauty (see her portfolio diptych, fifty images.) Kyoko’s site is a very rewarding, contemplative place to hang around. via It’s Nice That 


Vegetable Bowl by Kyoko Hamada

Kyoko Hamada (b 1973) was born in Tokyo and moved to the United States at the age of 15. She studied art history and fine art in New York, and Brooklyn where she has lived since 2001. For the past six years she has combined big-budget advertising campaigns for the likes of Microsoft with prize-winning editorial work for the New York Times, Washington Post, Fortune and Entertainment Weekly.

Very quiet, very composed and yet with many instances of incidental loveliness – the portfolio of Kyoko Hamada is filled with a great amount of alternating photographic series. From conceptual continuity (see pineapple under the bed and apples and bananas to random acts of beauty (see her portfolio diptych, fifty images.) Kyoko’s site is a very rewarding, contemplative place to hang around. 

via It’s Nice That 

sirmitchell:

The First Millisecond of a Nuclear Explosion Is the True Face of Atomic Death

This is fascinating, a nuclear explosion from the Tumbler-Snapper tests performed in Nevada during 1952. It looks different from all nuclear explosions you’ve seen because it’s what it looks like one millisecond after detonation. It looks like a skull by Tim Burton.
The face of atomic death just one second away from unleashing its absolute destruction.
Only one millisecond after the bomb explodes, this 65.6-foot (20 meters) ball of fire appears in midair, with spikes that look like rotten teeth or stalactites of fire (called the rope trick effect).
The explosion was captured by a Rapid Action Electronic camera—a high speed device designed to photograph nuclear explosions just milliseconds after ignition.
via Gizmodo

sirmitchell:

The First Millisecond of a Nuclear Explosion Is the True Face of Atomic Death

This is fascinating, a nuclear explosion from the Tumbler-Snapper tests performed in Nevada during 1952. It looks different from all nuclear explosions you’ve seen because it’s what it looks like one millisecond after detonation. It looks like a skull by Tim Burton.

The face of atomic death just one second away from unleashing its absolute destruction.

Only one millisecond after the bomb explodes, this 65.6-foot (20 meters) ball of fire appears in midair, with spikes that look like rotten teeth or stalactites of fire (called the rope trick effect).

The explosion was captured by a Rapid Action Electronic camera—a high speed device designed to photograph nuclear explosions just milliseconds after ignition.


Lovebird #5 | An Incomplete Dictionary of Showbirds by Luke StephensonLuke Stephenson was born in Darlington in the North East of England in 1983. He currently lives and works in London. In 2005 he was one of the winners of the Jerwood Photography Award and in 2006 he was selected to participate in the Festival International de Mode et de Photography in Hyeres. His work has been published in a.o. Portfolio, Dazed and Confused, Capriscious, Nico, Vice Magazine and Foam Magazine. The key elements within Luke’s work are centered around the perceptions we hold of others, and the objects with which we surround ourselves. Life in Britain and the British psyche are deeply ingrained within him, and provide a constant source of inspiration. Elements of quirky humor are used in his pictures to highlight a characteristic that may lead the viewer to a variety of conclusions; some intended, some that may be personal to the viewer alone. “I want my pictures to provide the basis of a thought, but for the viewer to finish the story.”
via Foam


Lovebird #5 | An Incomplete Dictionary of Showbirds by 
Luke Stephenson

Luke Stephenson was born in Darlington in the North East of England in 1983. He currently lives and works in London. In 2005 he was one of the winners of the Jerwood Photography Award and in 2006 he was selected to participate in the Festival International de Mode et de Photography in Hyeres. His work has been published in a.o. Portfolio, Dazed and Confused, Capriscious, Nico, Vice Magazine and Foam Magazine. 

The key elements within Luke’s work are centered around the perceptions we hold of others, and the objects with which we surround ourselves. Life in Britain and the British psyche are deeply ingrained within him, and provide a constant source of inspiration. Elements of quirky humor are used in his pictures to highlight a characteristic that may lead the viewer to a variety of conclusions; some intended, some that may be personal to the viewer alone. “I want my pictures to provide the basis of a thought, but for the viewer to finish the story.”

via Foam

Bildbauten by Phillipp Schaerer
The series of images with the title „Bildbauten“ deals with the effect and the claim to credibility of images of architecture that appear to be photographs. It further questions the medium “photograph” as a documentary piece of evidence depicting reality.
Frontal views of fictional architectures serve as an example. By means of their exaggerated and orchestrated way of representation, they model themselves on the object-like appearance and the formal language of contemporary architecture in a rather ironic way. All images try to reproduce a reality. They are not a photograph; instead, they were newly designed and constructed from scratch by means of image synthesis and digital image editing.
found at thisispaper


Bildbauten by Phillipp Schaerer

The series of images with the title „Bildbauten“ deals with the effect and the claim to credibility of images of architecture that appear to be photographs. It further questions the medium “photograph” as a documentary piece of evidence depicting reality.

Frontal views of fictional architectures serve as an example. By means of their exaggerated and orchestrated way of representation, they model themselves on the object-like appearance and the formal language of contemporary architecture in a rather ironic way. All images try to reproduce a reality. They are not a photograph; instead, they were newly designed and constructed from scratch by means of image synthesis and digital image editing.

found at thisispaper

Majid Karrouch by Freudenthal / Verhagen for Blend Magazine July 2010

Majid Karrouch by Freudenthal / Verhagen for Blend Magazine July 2010

Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm Blommers/Schumm play with the conventions of fashion and photography and refuse to treat fashion as a fixed format. Blommers and Schumm have worked for a variety of people, including graphic designer Jop van Bennekom and several fashion designers, among them Viktor & Rolf. Their photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Re-Magazine, Another magazine, Self Service, Purple, Interview, Dazed & Confused, i-D, Japanese Vogue, and Fantastic Man, while their work has been exhibited in the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, the Groninger Museum, Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, and the ICA in Boston.

Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm 

Blommers/Schumm play with the conventions of fashion and photography and refuse to treat fashion as a fixed format. Blommers and Schumm have worked for a variety of people, including graphic designer Jop van Bennekom and several fashion designers, among them Viktor & Rolf. Their photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Re-Magazine, Another magazine, Self Service, Purple, Interview, Dazed & Confused, i-D, Japanese Vogue, and Fantastic Man, while their work has been exhibited in the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, the Groninger Museum, Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, and the ICA in Boston.

Ephemera #1245, 2008 - Mark Laita
Color, form and movement captured in a vessel of water after drops of colored dyes are introduced.
via but does it float

Ephemera #1245, 2008 - Mark Laita

Color, form and movement captured in a vessel of water after drops of colored dyes are introduced.

via but does it float

Ingmar Swalue
Most of Ingmar Swalue’s pictures combine well-balanced composition with sensitivity for ambience, some reveal a dreamy, melancholic poetry. Image construction and atmosphere all attest to the enormous care he devotes to his work. There are no rough edges, there is nothing but precisely placed, almost cinematic stills. The dynamics of Ingmar’s work come into being through the contrast between solid properties such as walls and furniture, the soft language of form, and the atmospheric effects of light, color, transparency, and soft focus.
Website: www.ingmarswalue.com

Ingmar Swalue

Most of Ingmar Swalue’s pictures combine well-balanced composition with sensitivity for ambience, some reveal a dreamy, melancholic poetry. Image construction and atmosphere all attest to the enormous care he devotes to his work. There are no rough edges, there is nothing but precisely placed, almost cinematic stills. The dynamics of Ingmar’s work come into being through the contrast between solid properties such as walls and furniture, the soft language of form, and the atmospheric effects of light, color, transparency, and soft focus.

Website: www.ingmarswalue.com